The golden larches at Manning Park’s Frosty Mountain trail are seeing an ‘extreme level of visitors’ on weekends. (BC Parks/Facebook photo)

The golden larches at Manning Park’s Frosty Mountain trail are seeing an ‘extreme level of visitors’ on weekends. (BC Parks/Facebook photo)

‘Extreme level of visitors’ to Manning Park’s golden larches prompts travel advisory

Hikers going off trail or camping in larches could cause ‘irreparable damage’ to fragile environment

There is an ‘extreme level of visitors’ flocking to view E.C. Manning Provincial Park’s golden larches, prompting a travel advisory warning people to stay on the trail and not camp in the fragile ecosystem.

It is this time of year when the Frosty Mountain Trail in Manning Park offers stunning views of the thousands’ year old larches turning a golden colour. In an advisory shared by an area tourism organization, BC Parks warns anyone attempting the hike to be careful in the fragile ecosystem and consider a early morning weekday hike instead of on the weekend.

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The advisory states that parking could be several kilometres away from the trailhead on weekends. Visitors are also being reminded to keep physically distanced from others, keep their pets leashed at all times and to stay on the trail to avoid damaging this environmentally sensitive area.

“Walking off designated trails can cause irreparable damage to the plants and soil growing where you set foot,” read a statement on the Hope B.C. Cascades and Canyons website. Hikers must also follow leave no trace principles and pack out everything they bring into the park.

Camping in the larches is illegal, the advisory stated. Camping is only allowed in designated areas which are either at the Frosty Creek wilderness campsite, on the Lightning Lake side of the hike, or the Pacific Crest Trail wilderness campsite, on the Windy Joe side.

Drones are also illlegal in the park, the statement read, without explicit permission from BC Parks.

As the hike is a remote alpine trek and one where hikers could face ‘drastic climate changes’, the warning urged people to take proper precautions including researching the trek, carrying an emergency beacon and coming prepared with food, water, extra layers and emergency supplies.

Read more: Mandatory face coverings, wiping down chair lifts all part of Manning winter plans

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