A photo and diagram from the WorkSafeBC Incident Investigation Report illustrating improperly stacked metal roofing through which the foreman fell to his death in February 2017. He was unattached to the lifeline as seen at the bottom of the image. (WorkSafeBC)

A photo and diagram from the WorkSafeBC Incident Investigation Report illustrating improperly stacked metal roofing through which the foreman fell to his death in February 2017. He was unattached to the lifeline as seen at the bottom of the image. (WorkSafeBC)

Worker who fell to his death at Chilliwack job site wasn’t wearing fall protection

WorkSafeBC report found employer did not provide training, a safety plan or proper supervision

A young worker who fell to his death from a tilt-up building under construction at the Bailey Landfill two years ago wasn’t wearing fall protection, safety procedures weren’t followed, there was improper training of workers, and he was not being supervised.

Those are just some of the causes and contributing factors leading to the fatal workplace accident on Feb. 21, 2017, according to a WorkSafeBC Incident Investigation Report (IIR) The Progress obtained this week through a freedom of information request.

• READ MORE: Construction worker killed at Chilliwack landfill construction project

The report – which was redacted of the personal information of anyone involved in the incident – found that just after noon that day, a young worker fell between gaps in metal roofing being installed 14 metres (46 feet) to the concrete slab below.

“The direct cause of this incident was a fall from elevation due to the worker not being connected to the fall arrest system that was installed at the jobsite,” according to the conclusion in the IIR.

The IIR found the rigger and the welder were wearing fall protection.

“The rigger walked over near to where the foreman fell and saw him lying on the ground,” the report found. “The rigger yelled ‘Man down,’ and other workers attended to provide assistance. The foreman died at the jobsite.”

After the incident, an unnamed coworker posted on social media about witnessing the fatality.

“He didn’t make it,” he said in a Facebook post. “I have never in my life felt so helpless and scared. It’s going to be a rough night for me. Please help and say a prayer for his wife and family.”

The reason the young worker, who was the foreman, was not tied to his lifeline was not determined by the WorkSafeBC report. This statement in the IIR is followed by a sentence that has been redacted.

The worker was an employee of Well Done Welding World Ltd., which itself was subcontracted by the main contractor Titan Construction to build the waste transfer facility at the Bailey Landfill.

• READ MORE: Organic waste transfer station to be built in Chilliwack

The project was the third tilt-up building that Well Done had ever built. The company had three workers on site at the time of the incident: the foreman, who was identified as a “young worker” as defined by the Occupational Health and Safety Regulation; a rigger; and a welder.

The project was at the stage of construction where sheets of metal decking were lifted on to the roof.

“The Well Done workers did not follow the [safe work procedure] for placing the metal decking.”

The decking was stacked in such a way that it “created unnecessary and unsafe gaps in the metal decking…. One of these gaps in the metal decking was where the foreman fell from the roof.”

Further criticism in the IIR included the lack of safety meetings on site, the fact that the company had no written fall protection plan, the workers had minimal training, and no supervision when the incident occurred.

The IIR found the prime contractor, Titan Construction, was also responsible for the lack of supervision on site.

“If adequate site inspections had been carried out by Titan while the metal decking was being laid out on the roof, the unsafe manner in which it was being done might have been identified and addressed,” the report concluded.

“Much of the construction of this building was being performed at heights over 25 feet, yet no fall protection plan was in place.”

In the end, Titan Construction was found in violation of one section of the Workers Compensation Act (WCA), and Well Done Welding World was in violation of four sections of the WCA.

No details on penalties applied to Titan or Well Done were made available at this point. See www.theprogress.com for details when those become available.

• RELATED: Equipment malfunction blamed in Chilliwack workplace death

• RELATED: Safety rules broken when Chilliwack construction worker seriously injured


@PeeJayAitch
paul.henderson@theprogress.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Construction

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

(Black Press Media files)
Snowfall expected for Lower Mainland on Saturday night, Sunday morning

2 to 5 cm of snow predicted Metro Vancouver, according to Environment Canada

Fire on Yale Road north of the overpass Friday morning. (Progress file)
Early morning blaze guts Chilliwack restaurant

The fire erupted north of the overpass closing one lane of Yale Road

This woman is one of two people the Agassiz RCMP are asking for assistance in identifying after a string of alleged thefts in Popkum. (Agassiz RCMP)
Agassiz RCMP ask for help to identify suspects in Popkum thefts

Images of the two suspects were captured on surveillance footage between Jan. 10 and 16

Empty Royal Hotel windows are seen on Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021 along Main Street in downtown Chilliwack. They will soon be home to an upcoming project called Art on Main. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
Local talent sought for ‘Art on Main’ display in downtown Chilliwack

Art on Main a way for local artists to display work in windows of Chilliwack’s Royal Hotel

Businesses continue to struggle under COVID-19 restrictions as the pandemic reaches the one-year mark. (B.C. government)
Another 564 COVID-19 cases, mass vaccine plan coming Friday

15 more deaths, community cluster declared in Williams Lake

A specialized RCMP team is investigating a suspicious trailer, which might have connections to the illicit drug trade, found abandoned outside a Cache Creek motel. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> files)
Police probe U-Haul trailer linked to illicit drugs left outside Cache Creek motel

Hazardous materials found inside believed to be consistent with the production of illicit drugs

Premier John Horgan leaves the podium following his first press conference of the year as he comments on various questions from the media in the Press Gallery at B.C. Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Monday, January 13, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Interprovincial travel restrictions a no-go, Horgan says after reviewing legal options

The B.C. NDP government sought legal advice as concerns of travel continue

Gem Lake Top, at Big White Ski Resort, seen at Jan. 8. (Big White Ski Resort)
Big White cancels $7.3M in lift tickets, accommodations due to COVID-19 orders

Since November, the ski resort has been forced to make several changes

Darlene Curylo scratched a $3M ticket, BCLC’s largest ever scratch and win prize. (BCLC)
Kelowna woman in shock after winning BCLC’s largest-ever instant-ticket prize

Darlene Curylo couldn’t believe her eyes when she saw the amount of money she’d won from a scratch ticket

While each person has different reasons for becoming homeless, a UBCO study shows they learn through their interactions with different services to perform ‘as homeless’ based on the expectations of service providers. (Contributed)
Kelowna homeless forced to ‘perform’ for resources, says UBCO study

One participant in the study said ‘It is about looking homeless, but not too homeless’

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Gov. Gen. Julie Payette takes the royal salute from the Guard of Honour as she makes her way deliver the the throne speech, Wednesday, September 23, 2020 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Chartrand
Gov. Gen. Julie Payette resigns, apologizes for ‘tensions’ at Rideau Hall

Payette, who is the Queen’s representative in Canada, has been the governor general since 2017

Grounded WestJet Boeing 737 Max aircraft are shown at the airline’s facilities in Calgary, Alta., Tuesday, May 7, 2019. WestJet will operate the first commercial Boeing 737 Max flight in Canada today since the aircraft was grounded in 2019 following two deadly crashes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Passengers unfazed as WestJet returns Boeing 737 Max to service on Vancouver flight

After a lengthy review process, Transport Canada cleared the plane to return to Canadian airspace

Most Read