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Historical flooding data added to FVRD emergency map tool

Online users can look at overlay of flooding from 2012 and 1972 throughout Fraser Valley
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An interactive map that shows users where evacuation orders and alerts are along with other current information will now allow them to look at historical data as well. (Screenshot)

The Fraser Valley Regional District has updated its emergency map with historic flood markers.

The updated FVRD Emergency Status Map was made available this month, just as those living and working near the Fraser River and its tributaries have been keeping a close eye on the spring freshet.

It can be used to view important freshet information as well as historical flood data. The map will be continually updated to reflect current evacuation alerts, orders, and other useful information such as where residents can find sand and sandbags.

For example, as of Thursday morning, there are six notes on the map; three indicate areas with evacuation alerts (Harrison Mills, Nicomen Island and Laidlaw), and three indicate where sandbags are available.

The new historical data is included in the map for informational purposes only, the FVRD said in a release on July 4. The Fraser River Basin Council provided information for layers that can be added to the map that allow users to view past flood events from 2012 (1 in 20 year flooding) and 1972 (1 in 50 year flooding). The map is quite detailed

They also underlined that the “current forecast does not indicate river levels or flooding to match 2012 or 1972.”

The tools to adjust the map are found in the right hand corner.

READ MORE: Fraser River levels starting to recede but officials warn ‘waterways are still high and moving fast’


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Jessica Peters

About the Author: Jessica Peters

I began my career in 1999, covering communities across the Fraser Valley ever since.
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