Abbot John Braganza, 60, served at Westminster Abbey for 16 years. Google Maps image.

Abbot John Braganza, 60, served at Westminster Abbey for 16 years. Google Maps image.

Head abbot of Mission’s seminary school resigns

Abbot John Braganza’s resignation not due to any allegations of misconduct, Westminster Abbey says

The head abbot of Mission’s Seminary of Christ the King has resigned after concerns arose from his “interpersonal relations,” according to a statement released by Westminster Abbey.

Abbot John Braganza, 60, announced his resignation on May 3, after “months of personal and community discernment,” according to the statement.

“Abbot John has served as abbot for sixteen years with many accomplishments with regard to the life of the monastery and the Seminary of Christ the King, which the Abbey conducts,” the statement says.

“At this time, however, it has become evident that there is need for change and renewal, for both Abbot John and for the community.”

Braganza is listed as the chancellor of both the major (college) and minor (high school) seminary.

The resignation is not the result of allegations of sexual misconduct, or misconduct with minors, according to Westminster Abbey.

Father Benedict Lefebvre, the prior of the community, will act as the temporary administrator of the abbey, the statement says, until an abbatial election takes place on July 11.

“Abbot John will be away for a suitable period of time. Prayers are requested for Abbot John and the community in this time of transition.”

Westminster Abbey is a home to a community of Benedictine monks, who operate the attached seminaries. The minor seminary is the last remaining high school seminary in Canada.

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Mission

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