The 11th annual West Coast Christmas Show and Artisan Marketplace comes to the Abbotsford Tradex Nov. 16 to 18.

Your holiday shopping starts – and finishes – here!

Exceptional shopping, talented artisans, kids’ holiday fun and more… all under one roof

Can you start and finish all your holiday shopping in one place? You can if that place is the 11th annual West Coast Christmas Show and Artisan Marketplace!

With more than 250 vendors – including 150+ select artisans – coming to the Abbotsford Tradex Nov. 16 to 18, this is where your holiday shopping begins and ends.

The event is not-to-be-missed. Here’s why!

  1. Picture-perfect shopping destination: With your favourite holiday music and seasonal decorations creating a festive feel, the holidays come alive at this annual show. Expect to see many of your returning favourites but more than a few exciting innovations as well.
  2. New & Novel: Don’t miss the inaugural appearance of the Miniature Christmas Dollhouse Display, a Christmas-themed dollhouse and themed rooms from the Vancouver Dollhouse Miniature Show with submissions from the members of the Miniature Club of BC.

    And bring your “injured” stuffies to the show’s Teddy Bear Hospital for consultation and repairs with the specialists onsite.

  3. Community connections: The BC Artisan Marketing Society’s Sharing Tree, in co-operation with artisan Sharon Hubbard, benefits local charitable organizations participating in the Festival of Trees. For a minimum donation of $5, write a card and place it on one of the Share Trees and keep one of the artisan’s handmade ornaments as a keepsake of your contribution.

    New this year, look for Hubbard’s tree decorations created from large goose eggs (minimum $10 donation), along with chicken egg and clam shell ornaments. Stop by the Abbotsford Community Services’ coat and parcel check and gift-wrapping service by donation to Meals on Wheels. They’ll also be accepting new, unwrapped new toys – a great way to make Christmas happier for local children in need.

  4. Home for the holidays: Entertaining will be a breeze with the home décor and gourmet food products on offer … plus fresh ideas from the pros on the Home for the Holidays Stage. From unique tree-trimmings to the stunning table decorations, you’ll find it here, plus an on-site nursery for live seasonal décor!
  5. Something special: In the Artisan Marketplace, find work by more than 150 artists and artisans, while the men on your list will appreciate something special from exhibitors like The Fly Box (custom tied fishing flies) or custom tree-themed liquor dispensers from The Tapped Tree. And who can resist something from The Bad Ass Gentleman line of grooming products!

    In addition to gifts for kids of all ages found throughout the show, little ones will delight in the working model train set on display and free activities in Santa’s Workshop. Bring your camera for pictures with Santa and Mrs. Claus, and stop by the Bandits basketball team’s face painting station where you can meet team members.

Ready to visit? Here’s what you need to know!

• Enjoy free parking courtesy of the show management.

• Don’t miss your chance to win great prizes in the Ugly Christmas Sweater contest and other draw prize opportunities.

Purchase tickets online to save $1 on regular and senior admission ($9 and $8 after discount) and avoid line-ups at the door. Youth to age 16 are free with accompanying adult. Visit Sunday morning for a special family rate, available at the gate from 10 to 11 a.m.

Your Christmas starts at the West Coast Christmas Show and Artisan Marketplace – see you there!

 

Entertaining will be a breeze with the home décor and gourmet food products on offer at the West Coast Christmas Show and Artisan Marketplace.

Find gifts for him at the West Coast Christmas Show and Artisan Marketplace.

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