A scene from the documentary film “Anthropocene” an environment shaped by human influence. The documentary will be shown during the Earth Day event at the Agassiz United Church on April 26. (Image/Anthropocene: The Human Epoch)

Agassiz, Harrison to examine human impact on the planet for Earth Day

The annual Earth Day event will be taking place at the Agassiz United Church on April 26

Minds will be broadened during this year’s Earth Day event at the Agassiz United Church.

At least, that’s the plan.

“They’re coming to have their minds expanded, to learn something,” Betty Rajotte, one of the organizers of the annual event said. “And also to meet with the community and see what is being done in the community” to protect the planet.

“I just think it’s part of our stewardship of the earth, that we should be all concerned about it and take as much interest as we can,” she said.

For the last five or six years, the church’s outreach committee has put on a documentary screening and talk for Earth Day, in an effort to raise awareness about things that are happening in the world.

In the past, the event has featured documentaries about bees, Haida Gwaii and the fashion industry’s impacts on rivers. This year, the documentary of choice in Anthropocene, an award-winning production that looks at human impact on a geological scale.

“It’s a bit controversial, some scientists don’t accept it,” Rajotte said.

”We always show documentary films, and they always have a point of view of course,” she added. “So there’s arguable points in them, but that’s the whole idea. To stimulate your mind and thinking with research.”

RELATED: Community Earth Day offers small steps for helping environment

After the film, fire ecologist Bob Gray will give a presentation on the increasing risk of forest fires in our natural habitats.

“It’s about changes in the world that endanger the climate and maybe advance climate changes,” Rajotte said about Anthropocene. “With the forest fires, there’s a connection between the drier climate and the melting of the glaciers and the rivers.

“It’s all connected, so we thought that was a good fit.”

The night will also feature displays from the local stream keepers, Earthwise Agassiz and the Friends of Agassiz and Harrison Hot Springs; the Fraser Valley Regional Library will have related books and movies available to take out at the event.

Over the years, the event has collected about 40 residents who consistently come to learn about the challenges facing the world, as well as others who are more interested in the social opportunity the event brings.

This year, the Earth Day event will be held Friday, April 26 at the Agassiz United Church (6860 Lougheed Hwy) starting at 7 p.m. Admission is by donation, and refreshments are provided.



grace.kennedy@ahobserver.com

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