(Pixabay.com)

Trick or treat, keep candy wrappers off the street

London Drugs launches province-wide recycling program for ‘hard to process’ packaging

Conscious of the packaging Halloween candy can garner?

London Drugs wants to help out and launched the first Halloween candy wrapper recycling drive in the province.

Part of its Other Flexible Plastic Packaging program, the retailer is accepting chocolate bar and candy wrappers as well as potato chip bags to keep the waste out of landfills.

RELATED: Candy calculator: Map estimates number of trick or treaters

Bring your discarded wrappers to any London Drugs location and the “garbage” will be sent to Merlin Plastics, a processing plant in Delta, working on developing a viable method of recycling common, but tough to process items.

“This is really a big problem; the volume of wrapper waste is significant. That’s why we’re making a commitment to help address it – not just at Halloween but year-round,” said Maury McCausland of London Drugs.

RELATED: Halloween roundup: Bonfires and fireworks in Greater Victoria

Any material that cannot be recycled will be used to produce engineered fuel for commercial operations.

According to Statistics Canada, more than $500 million worth of cookies, confectionery and snack foods were sold across Canada in October of 2017, generating significant amounts of waste.

RELATED: Halloween horrors sprouting up all over Halloween

Additionally, the Ocean Conservatory found food wrappers were among the top five items found during their International Coastal Clean-up last year.

“Last year, with the help of our customers and staff, our stores celebrated a 93 per cent waste diversion rate,” McCausland said of the flexible packaging program. “This program will help get us one step closer to zero waste.”


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