research

FILE – Mark Scheifele (55, Winnipeg Jets, blue) hits Jake Evans (71, Montreal Canadiens, white) with a violent hit to the head last June in a Stanley Cup playoff game (John Woods/The Canadian Press via AP)

Should head shots be banned in the NHL? 89% of hockey fans say yes

1000 Canadians and “hockey fans” were polled and believe the game would be more appealing

 

New studies suggest constant light alcohol consumption puts you at risk for various cancers just as much as binge drinking. (Pixabay photo)

Light alcohol consumption just as risky as binge drinking, BC Cancer study says

One out of seven new cancers were caused by light to moderate drinking in 2020

 

Ryan Rhodes is a University of Victoria professor and expert in exercise science, studying the psychology behind healthy behaviours. (Photo courtesy of the University of Victoria)

New year’s resolution dying already? B.C. psychologist has the answer

Resolutions are cliche – adopting healthy habits takes time, UVic expert says

 

University of Victoria psychologist Nigel Mantou Lou led a research project studying Asian-Canadian discrimination in Canada. He and his team found that anti-Asian racism has increased during the pandemic. (Courtesy UVic Photo Services)

B.C. study shows hate crimes against Asian Canadians increased during pandemic

Many survey participants fear their children will be bullied due to their Chinese identity

University of Victoria psychologist Nigel Mantou Lou led a research project studying Asian-Canadian discrimination in Canada. He and his team found that anti-Asian racism has increased during the pandemic. (Courtesy UVic Photo Services)
(Pixabay)

B.C. alcohol consumption rates hit a 20-year peak in 2021

University of Victoria researcher says increased availability leads to people drinking more

(Pixabay)
A five-year Statistics Canada survey on victimization found rates of respondents self-reporting physical and/or sexual violence in their spousal or partner relationships came down between 1999 and 2019. (Pixabay)

Survey: spousal violence on decline in Canada; women still more likely to suffer

Findings capture conditions before COVID-19 pandemic sent many into isolation

A five-year Statistics Canada survey on victimization found rates of respondents self-reporting physical and/or sexual violence in their spousal or partner relationships came down between 1999 and 2019. (Pixabay)
File – Provincial funding for UBC improves research and innovation in 2016. (B.C. Government handout)

34 university innovation projects backed by $25M in B.C. funding

UBC, SFU, TRU and UVic all received the funds to help further studies

File – Provincial funding for UBC improves research and innovation in 2016. (B.C. Government handout)
(The Canadian Press photo)

An ocean menace: Study finds ghost gear capturing species at risk and lobster

‘We can actually make more money if we clean up our act’

(The Canadian Press photo)
The Sardinia Radio Telescope, located in Sardinia, Italy. Credit: S. Fatigoni et al (2021)

B.C. scientists capture most-detailed radio image of the Milky Way’s sister galaxy

Scientists first to create a radio image of the Andromeda Galaxy at the microwave frequency of 6.6 GHz

The Sardinia Radio Telescope, located in Sardinia, Italy. Credit: S. Fatigoni et al (2021)
Bill Merilees, a retired B.C. Parks regional information officer, collected mollusk shells from B.C. and Washington state coastlines for 50 years and has donated his 140,000-specimen collection to University of British Columbia’s Beaty Biodiversity Museum. (Chris Bush/News Bulletin)

VIDEO: B.C. man donates 140,000 mollusk specimens to biodiversity museum

UBC’s Beaty museum grateful for Bill Merilees’s historical record of B.C. marine biodiversity

Bill Merilees, a retired B.C. Parks regional information officer, collected mollusk shells from B.C. and Washington state coastlines for 50 years and has donated his 140,000-specimen collection to University of British Columbia’s Beaty Biodiversity Museum. (Chris Bush/News Bulletin)
This March 2002 file photo shows a deer tick under a microscope in the entomology lab at the University of Rhode Island in South Kingstown, R.I. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Victoria Arocho

Harvard student, Queen’s prof, collaborating to rapidly identify Lyme-infected ticks

If successful, the test will open the door to better and faster treatment for the rapidly expanding disease

This March 2002 file photo shows a deer tick under a microscope in the entomology lab at the University of Rhode Island in South Kingstown, R.I. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Victoria Arocho
In this photo provided by the Human Adaptation Institute on Saturday, April 24, 2021, a member of the team taking part in the “Deep Time” study explores the Lombrives Cave in Ussat les Bains, France. After 40 days in voluntary isolation, 15 people participating in a scientific experiment have emerged from a vast cave in southwestern France. Eight men and seven women lived in the dark, damp depths of the Lombrives cave in the Pyrenees to help researchers understand how people adapt to drastic changes in living conditions and environments. They had no clocks, no sunlight and no contact with the world above. (Human Adaptation Institute via AP)

Out of the cave: French isolation study ends after 40 days

The team members followed their biological clocks to know when to wake up, go to sleep and eat

In this photo provided by the Human Adaptation Institute on Saturday, April 24, 2021, a member of the team taking part in the “Deep Time” study explores the Lombrives Cave in Ussat les Bains, France. After 40 days in voluntary isolation, 15 people participating in a scientific experiment have emerged from a vast cave in southwestern France. Eight men and seven women lived in the dark, damp depths of the Lombrives cave in the Pyrenees to help researchers understand how people adapt to drastic changes in living conditions and environments. They had no clocks, no sunlight and no contact with the world above. (Human Adaptation Institute via AP)
Dr. Iris Lesser exercises on Vedder Rotary Trail in January with her infant daughter. Lesser is a researcher with the University of the Fraser Valley, currently on maternity leave. She will be taking part in a research study soon for postpartum women. (Anne Russell/ UFV)

Postpartum moms invited to group fitness class for UFV research

Program’s goal is to explore the impact of group fitness of anxiety in postpartum women

Dr. Iris Lesser exercises on Vedder Rotary Trail in January with her infant daughter. Lesser is a researcher with the University of the Fraser Valley, currently on maternity leave. She will be taking part in a research study soon for postpartum women. (Anne Russell/ UFV)
New study out of Norway suggests COVID-19 personality types can be used to reduce transmission. (Black Press Media file photo)

New study suggests there are 16 COVID-19 personality types — which one are you?

Pandemic response must be tailored to people’s different beliefs

New study out of Norway suggests COVID-19 personality types can be used to reduce transmission. (Black Press Media file photo)
Jackie Hildering, whale researcher with the Marine Education and Research Society, and Nanaimo Area Land Trust will present the Return of Giants, a webinar about the humpback whales’ return from the brink of extinction and how boaters can help protect them. (Jackie Hildering/MERS photo taken under Marine Mammal License MML-42)

‘Return of the Giants:’ B.C. getting 2nd chance to coexist with humpback whales

‘Marine Detective’ partners with Nanaimo stewardship group on webinar

Jackie Hildering, whale researcher with the Marine Education and Research Society, and Nanaimo Area Land Trust will present the Return of Giants, a webinar about the humpback whales’ return from the brink of extinction and how boaters can help protect them. (Jackie Hildering/MERS photo taken under Marine Mammal License MML-42)
(Photo: Dixon Tam)

Ever-changing pandemic pressures scientific research publication: SFU study

Publication of preliminary studies caused confusion in early pandemic days, research finds

(Photo: Dixon Tam)
A new UBC study published in the Emergency Medicine Journal on Oct. 29, 2020 found fewer children are visiting ER departments at B.C. hospitals. (Children’s Hospital/Facebook)

Fewer children visiting emergency rooms in B.C. during pandemic: UBC study

The research is published in the Emergency Medicine Journal

A new UBC study published in the Emergency Medicine Journal on Oct. 29, 2020 found fewer children are visiting ER departments at B.C. hospitals. (Children’s Hospital/Facebook)
Zeena Dotiwalla cleans dumbbells at Yogaspace in Toronto on Wednesday, March 11, 2020. A new study out of the Fraser Valley is looking at the relation between exercise and COVID-19. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin)

Research study looking for COVID-19 survivors for exercise survey

Worldwide study led by University of the Fraser Valley exercise physiology researcher

Zeena Dotiwalla cleans dumbbells at Yogaspace in Toronto on Wednesday, March 11, 2020. A new study out of the Fraser Valley is looking at the relation between exercise and COVID-19. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin)
Dr. Iris Lesser has been involved in several studies looking at the correlation between exercise and the mental wellbeing of cancer survivors, including one called Take A Hike, which was led by a UFV student in the fall of 2019. (UFV photo)

Cancer survivor study looking at connection to outdoor exercise needs more participants

Online study researching ways to provide better physical activity programs for cancer survivors

Dr. Iris Lesser has been involved in several studies looking at the correlation between exercise and the mental wellbeing of cancer survivors, including one called Take A Hike, which was led by a UFV student in the fall of 2019. (UFV photo)
A white-throated sparrow is shown in a handout photo. Ken Otter, a biology professor at the University of Northern British Columbia, whose paper on the phenomenon was published in June 2020 said most bird species are slow to change their songs, preferring to stick with tried-and-true tunes to defend territories and attract females. (University of Northern British Columbia photo)

White-throated sparrows have changed their tune, B.C. study unveils

Study marks an unprecedented development scientists say has caused them to sit up and take note

A white-throated sparrow is shown in a handout photo. Ken Otter, a biology professor at the University of Northern British Columbia, whose paper on the phenomenon was published in June 2020 said most bird species are slow to change their songs, preferring to stick with tried-and-true tunes to defend territories and attract females. (University of Northern British Columbia photo)