Second thoughts on the HST

Although initially strongly negative on the HST, I have long since realized my feelings were really a reaction to Gordon Campbell’s assumption that he could get away with not explaining it in advance, so that it could be debated publicly before it was passed into law. That assumption cost him the premiership.

Although initially strongly negative on the HST, I have long since realized my feelings were really a reaction to Gordon Campbell’s assumption that he could get away with not explaining it in advance, so that it could be debated publicly before it was  passed into law. That assumption cost him the premiership.

Clearly, the HST, as originally presented, would have cost me more in taxes, but I eventually realized that it was in the best long term interest of the province, in terms of jobs and the economy.  Those long term benefits to my children and grandchildren are what made me decide that I would vote to keep the HST.

Now with the rebates and the phased in reduction in HST to 10 per cent, there will be little if any increase in net tax to most people.

I have read the Independent Panel’s report on the HST. It spells out the pros and cons of both the HST and the previous PST/GST.  It is very informative and not difficult reading.

Want to read it?  Google “HST of PST/GST?  It’s Your Decision”.

But remember, the report was issued before the government announced that the HST would be reduced to 10 per cent, and also before the promised rebates, which together make the impact really very palatable.

I am convinced that overall the benefits of staying with the HST are more than worth the short term net cost of paying a little more for comparatively few goods and services.  Join me in voting to keep the HST.

 

Jake Wiebe