Letter: What’s needed is driver etiquette

Public education program beats a punitive law, and this one could even go a long way to reducing incidents of driver anxiety and road rage.

I agree with your editorial assessment (An unnecessary law) concerning the new “Slow Driver” legislation proposed by the BC Liberals.  At best it’s a make work-project for government busy-bodies; at worst it’s a money grab on B.C.’s drivers.

Your analysis that this law “came out of nowhere” seems correct.  I don’t remember drivers clamoring for relief from the slowpoke in the fast lane.  Also, how would the law be enforced when those going the speed limit are the slowpokes.  It seems that the new higher limits only increased the top speed of those who are willing to break the law.  Is it now a crime to drive at the posted speed if you are holding back “Mr./Ms. Impatient” who has had one too many Tim Horton’s Dark Roasts?

Last week I made a suggestion to MLA, Laurie Throness on this topic.  ICBC could use some of the money they are donating to B.C.’s general tax coffers and run a province wide campaign to institute a friendly gesture of driver camaraderie and etiquette.  Much like the “Wave of the Hand-Thanks for the Brake!” slogan seen on local buses, our province could adopt a “Double Beep, and Wave” reminder, that politely asks some one who may be impeding your progress to move to the right hand lane.

Laurie did not go for it, and he mentioned that honking at a fellow driver often causes anger and even road rage. That’s why the program needs promotion and discussion.  Also, these are probably good actions to take for any politician who tables new legislation.  I feel a public education program beats a punitive law every time, and this one could even go a long way to reducing incidents of driver anxiety and road rage.

Gary Raddysh

Chilliwack