Green Party gets lost in the static

The election of Elizabeth May as Canada’s first-ever Green Party MP was supposed to be a breakthrough for environmental issues. Too bad she blew it.

B.C. Green Party leader Jane Sterk campaigned in the 2009 election for implementation of smart meters.

VICTORIA – The election of Elizabeth May as Canada’s first-ever Green Party MP was supposed to be a breakthrough for environmental issues.

Finally embraced by voters in the organic farming region of Saanich-Gulf Islands, May was given a mandate to change the political conversation about sustainable development, climate change and pollution. The breakthrough might even translate to the provincial level, where Jane Sterk is the latest of a line of B.C. Green leaders to toil in obscurity.

It’s too bad they both threw away their scientific credibility last week, by chiming in with the tiny tinfoil-hat movement and its trumped-up opposition to BC Hydro’s transition to wireless meters.

May got the tinfoil ball rolling by decrying the use of wireless internet. It might be contributing to bee colony collapse, she mused on Twitter, to much ridicule. Apparently she believes that using a computer connected by a wire keeps her free from the radio waves that surround us all. They are generated not only by computers, cell phones and smart meters but all sources of light, including the infrared light that accompanies body heat.

May then cited the much-hyped revelation that the World Health Organization has listed radio-frequency waves as a possible carcinogen. Radio waves such as those generated by cell phones and wireless routers were moved to a classification called 2B, which also includes such volatile substances as pickled vegetables.

What this actually means is that health effects can’t be ruled out. It’s impossible to prove that something’s impossible. But after many years of study, the evidence that cell phones and such devices cause illness remains at precisely zero.

With May alongside, Sterk called a news conference last week to demand a halt to BC Hydro’s smart meter program. The first question from a reporter was, why are you reversing the BC Greens’ 2009 election platform, which called for installation of smart meters by 2012, followed by imposition of time-of-use electricity pricing to reduce consumption?

Sterk expressed surprise, apparently having forgotten her own position from only two years ago. Political credibility takes years to build but only seconds to destroy.

I attended the B.C. Green Party’s 2007 leadership convention at which Sterk was elected. It came after a long and divisive debate over whether cell phones could be used at the meeting. They were finally allowed, but this “issue” apparently took up more time than any policy discussion.

Why is BC Hydro putting in smart meters? First, mechanical meters are obsolete and soon won’t be available. Second, B.C. is about twice as big as Germany. Finding, let alone fixing damaged power lines is a monumental task. A smart grid (much more than just digital meters) is not only self-assessing, it can be made self-healing, rerouting power to blacked-out areas when weather, transformer failure or vehicle accidents cut power.

Do smart meters continuously communicate with a “mother ship,” as some claim? Do they record when you get up at night to pee? No and no. These are the kinds of nonsense claims that surround the smart meter issue.

BC Hydro says four to six transmissions from a smart meter to a local hub each day amount to about a minute in total. Radio wave exposure is equivalent to a half-hour cell phone call every 20 years.

The British National Cancer Institute just published an extensive study of children with brain tumours and exposure to cell phones. Like previous studies, it found no correlation.

Somebody should send a postcard to the Green Party and tell them about it.

Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

VIDEO: Find Me My Furever Home – Twister at the Chilliwack SPCA

Small animals like rats are one of the first to be surrendered and last to get adopted

Unofficial holidays: the weird and wonderful things people celebrate around the world

On any given day of the year, there are several strange, silly or serious holidays to observe

Chilliwack Salvation Army to give away free laundry detergent and more at drive-thru event

They will be handing out Tide detergent, toothpaste and eggs to anyone who is in need

SLIDESHOW: Chilliwack firefighters battle large blaze at Rosedale chicken barn Friday

Majority of birds saved but buildings on Castleman Road destroyed by fire

Chilliwack Fair kicks off tonight with local talent

Todd Richard and Appaloosa to hit the stage for drive-in concert at fairgrounds

53 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths cap off week of high infection rates in B.C.

Roughly 1,500 people are self-isolating because they either have COVID-19 or have been exposed to it

VIDEO: Internet famous Yukon-based bhangra dancer explores Vancouver Island

Gurdeep Pandher spreads joy through dance, forms cross-cultural connections amid pandemic

Fraser Valley Bandits advance to CEBL Championship Game

Bandits post comeback 76-75 win over Hamilton Honey Badgers in Saturday’s semifinal

IHIT on scene of suspicious early-morning fire on rural Mission property

Entrance to Gunn Avenue property cordoned off while investigation takes place, updates coming

Moving on: Tanev scores 11 seconds into OT as Canucks oust Wild

Vancouver beats Minnesota 5-4 to move into first round of NHL playoffs

FURTHER UPDATE: Body removed from Maple Ridge hotel after large police presence

A large contingent of Mounties were at the Art Infiniti Hotel Friday afternoon and evening

Gene editing debate takes root with organic broccoli, new UBC research shows

Broccoli is one of the best-known vegetables with origins in this scientific haze

VIDEO: U.S. Air Force pilot does fly-by for B.C. son amid COVID border separation

Sky-high father-son visit plays out over White Rock Pier

3 Vancouver police officers test positive for COVID after responding to large party

Union president says other officers are self-isolating due to possible exposure

Most Read