Drivers warned to slow down

Drivers in B.C. need to be better trained and their vehicles need a governor so that they cannot travel over the posted speed limit

As a former resident of Chilliwack (near Vedder Crossing) and working in Vancouver (BC Hydro), I spent four years (1981-85) commuting 125 miles per day either by car or by bus (Pacific Stage Lines) and I would more than often see vehicles off the highway in the ditch during rainy days, foggy mornings or when there was more than half an inch of snow on the roadway.  Between 1999 and 2001, I commuted to Vancouver from Abbotsford (while working for the BC Liberal Party) either by car or by West Coast Express and when driving by car, would see the same … but only more vehicles off the highway.  Nearly two decades had past and still no improvement in B.C. driver behaviour.

B.C. drivers, it seems, get their licences out of a Cracker Jack box as we witness with over 260,000 crashes and over 51,000 casualties per year (712 crashes and 140 casualties per day/seven days per week/52 weeks per year) with speed, alcohol/drugs/medication, distraction, high-risk driving and driving to fast for the conditions being the major contributing factors.  (ICBC – Quick Statistics – September 2013, which also has a breakdown of the Fraser Valley by community)

The last factor – driving too fast for the conditions – seems to be applicable to the massive 17-vehicle pile-up at the Vedder Canal Bridge last week after idiot fishermen or teenagers lit a campfire, probably with wood that was wet, and idiot drivers failed to adjust their driving habits to cope with the smoke that reduced driving visibility to zero.

But of all the stupidity, I see one Chilliwackian wonders if we had a Tram Train service from Chilliwack to Vancouver and would it reduce the chances of major accidents, especially in icy weather.

This individual seems to be stuck on the idea that a passenger rail in the valley would offer a handy alternative for people wishing to travel to Vancouver, Surrey, Langley or Abbotsford.  He wonders if such a Tram Train Service is just too simple and cost effective for politicians and bureaucrats to consider.

No it would not reduce the chances of major accidents.  No, it would not be a cost-effective alternative for people going anywhere.  And, his idea is just far “too simple-minded”.

Drivers in B.C. need to be better trained and their vehicles need a governor so that they cannot travel over the posted speed limit and they need to learn about defensive driving.

 

G.E. MacDonell

Abbotsford