Elsie KEEGAN

5 December 1919 — 1 November 2005

With deep sadness, we announce the passing of Elsie Keegan. She is survived by her loving husband of 62 years, Patrick, her four daughters, Joyce Keegan, Amelia Cox, Patricia Keegan (Bryan), and Beverly Kennedy (Robert), seven grandchildren, Terrill Scott (Warren), Richard Nasadyk (Karen), Rodney Cox, Kevin Cox, Darren Kennedy (Lenni), Warren Kennedy (Melissa), and Scott Kennedy (Andrea), eight great-grandchildren, Jeremy Scott (Christa), Jesse Scott (Lindsay), Kyle Kennedy, Jake Nasadyk, Caleb Nasadyk, Shelby Kennedy, Nicholas Kennedy, and Joey Kennedy, three great-great-grandchildren, Zoey Scott, Emily Scott, and Quinton Scott, niece Linda Carroll, and nephew Ken Mairs. She is predeceased by her parents, Mary and Henry Miller, sister, Mary Mairs, and granddaughter Janet Nasadyk.

Elsie was born in Schaffhaeusen, Russia, and immigrated to Canada at the age of three with her family. She moved a great deal with her family when she was young, but lived mostly in Vancouver. With Patrick and her daughters, she lived in Harrison Hot Springs in the early and late 1950s and early 60s. She and Patrick lived in Agassiz for a time in the early 70s and moved permanently to Agassiz in 1977.

Elsie loved art in all its forms, both as an observer and participant. She was an accomplished visual artist, had a beautiful singing voice, studied guitar and piano, loved to dance, taught ballroom and tap dancing to adults and children in Harrison, Agassiz, and Rainbow Lake, Alberta, as well as acting in and directing amateur theatre productions.

She worked at times with her husband in the catering industry as chef’s assistant and office clerk, often at remote and isolated camps, and acted in TV commercials in the mid 70s. She was a devoted mother and grandmother, wonderful homemaker, skilled craftswoman, and an avid reader who would find books for anyone seeking information or expressing a desire to learn. Elsie was a life-long learner, teaching herself how to use a computer while in her 70s; one of her favourite computer applications was restoring old photographs. With her characteristic sympathy, understanding and non-judgmental attitude, Elsie’s advice for anyone with a problem was “Take control of your own life,” a maxim she followed all her life.

Elsie’s family held a private celebration of her life. If anyone wishes to commemorate her life, in lieu of flowers, donations to the Alzheimer’s Society of BC would be appreciated.