Pipe being used for the Trans Mountain pipeline. Construction on the pipeline could restart by mid-September, the Crown corporation says. (Trans Mountain Corp.)

Pipe being used for the Trans Mountain pipeline. Construction on the pipeline could restart by mid-September, the Crown corporation says. (Trans Mountain Corp.)

Trans Mountain gives contractors 30 days to get workers, supplies ready for pipeline

Crown corporation believes the expansion project could be in service by mid-2022

Construction is slated to begin again on the Trans Mountain pipeline.

In a notice issued Wednesday by Trans Mountain Corp., the Crown corporation said it had given its prime construction contractors 30 days notice to begin “hiring workers, procuring goods and services and developing detailed construction work plans.”

About 4,200 workers are expected to be employed building the pipeline, Trans Mountain Corp. said. The federal government purchased the pipeline expansion back in 2018 for $4.5 billion.

It went through a re-approval process earlier this year and was green lit in June.

VIDEO: Trans Mountain expansion project gets green light, again

Work is scheduled to start up again in communities along the route between Edmonton and the terminals in Burnaby. This will include a right-of-way in Alberta and an “immediate” return to work at the Burnaby and Westridge Marine terminals.

“Clearly this Project has been subjected to numerous delays and setbacks over the past several years. With today’s announcement on the commencement of construction, I firmly believe that we are finally able to start delivering the significant national and regional benefits we have always committed to,” said CEO Ian Anderson.

The Crown corporation said if it gets the permits and approvals it needs on time, the expansion project could be in service by mid-2022.

The federal national resources minister Amarjeet Sohi is expected to provide more details on the project in Alberta Wednesday.

READ MORE: Shovels could be in the ground on Trans Mountain by September, CEO says

READ MORE: Insurance firms urged to stop coverage of Trans Mountain pipeline

READ MORE: Indigenous bidder kicks off ‘listening tour’ along Trans Mountain route


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katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

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