Ann Stouse, Holly Stouse and Claudia Bakiera walk Lady MacDuff, a black lab, and Kira, a border collie, along the dike at the north end of Sharpe Road in Pitt Meadows on Thursday, when the air quality advisory from Metro Vancouver for Maple Ridge was at seven, a high health risk. The smoky skies are forecast to stick around for days, according to Environment Canada. Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS

UPDATE: Air quality advisory continued for Metro Vancouver and Fraser Valley

Temperature records broken across B.C.

An intense heat wave broke maximum temperature records in communities all over B.C. on Wednesday, some going back 100 years, according to Environment Canada, and a regional air quality advisory continues.

A ridge of high pressure over the southern portion of the province led to several days of temperature records.

Agassiz saw a high of 35.6 C on Aug. 2, compared to the previous record of 34.4 C in 1898.

Chilliwack saw a high of 35.6 degrees that same day, compared to a previous record of 32.8 degrees in 1927.

On the island, the Victoria Harbour area reached temperatures not seen since 1891.

Temperatures in the Lower Mainland are expected to sit between 25 and 30 C throughout the rest of this week.

Metro Vancouver maintains its air quality advisory for fine particulate matter and ground-level ozone.

The air quality advisory in Maple Ridge, as of Thursday afternoon, is an eight rating, which is “high” health risk on the index.

The smoky skies are forecast to stick around for days, according to Environment Canada.

Yesterday, conditions were extremely smoky across the Lower Mainland, with the air quality index rising to 10 in the Central Fraser Valley, indicating a high health risk.

“Metro Vancouver is continuing an air quality advisory for Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley because of high concentrations of fine particulate matter that are expected to persist until there is a change in the weather. Air quality continues to be affected by the current weather pattern over the B.C. Coast, which has caused outflow winds to transport smoke from wildfires burning in the BC Interior into our region.

“Concentrations of ground-level ozone are also expected to reach advisory levels in the eastern portions of Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley due to the hot weather conditions.”

According to Metro, ground-level ozone is not emitted directly into the air – it is formed when nitrogen oxides (pollutants emitted when fuels are burned) and volatile organic compounds (emitted from solvents) react in the air in the presence of sunlight.

The highest levels of ground-level ozone are generally observed between mid-afternoon and early evening on summer days.

“Avoid strenuous outdoor activities, particularly during mid-afternoon and early evening, when ozone levels are highest. Exposure to ozone and fine particulate matter is particularly a concern for infants, the elderly and those who have underlying medical conditions, such as lung disease, heart disease, diabetes or asthma. If you are experiencing symptoms such as chest discomfort, shortness of breath, coughing or wheezing, follow the advice of your healthcare provider. As we are in the summer season with warm temperatures, it is also important to stay cool and hydrated. Indoor spaces with air conditioning may offer relief from both heat and air pollution.”

This advisory is expected to continue until there is a change in the current weather.

Metro Vancouver works in cooperation with Environment and Climate Change Canada, Fraser Valley Regional District and B.C. Ministry of Environment to look after air quality.

What is ground-level ozone?

Ground-level ozone is not emitted directly into the air. It is formed when nitrogen oxides (pollutants emitted when fuels are burned) and volatile organic compounds (emitted from solvents) react in the air in the presence of sunlight. The highest levels of ground-level ozone are generally observed between mid-afternoon and early evening on summer days.

What is fine particulate matter?

Fine particulate matter, also known as PM2.5, refers to airborne solid or liquid droplets with a diameter of 2.5 micrometres or less. PM2.5 can easily penetrate indoors because of their small size. PM2.5 concentrations tend to be highest around busy roads, industrial operations, major ports as well as areas with residential wood burning.

Tips to reduce your personal health risk:

• Stay cool and drink plenty of water.

• Use symptom management medications, such as inhalers, if needed.

• Continue to manage medical conditions such as asthma, chronic respiratory disease and heart failure. If symptoms continue to be bothersome, seek medical attention.

• Maintaining good overall health is a good way to prevent health effects resulting from short-term exposure to air pollution.

Fersons with chronic underlying medical conditions:

• Avoid strenuous activity outdoors and stay in cool, air-conditioned environments, especially during the afternoon and early evening when ozone levels are highest.

• Reduce indoor sources of pollution such as smoking and vacuuming, and run an air cleaner. Some room air cleaners, such as HEPA filters, can help reduce indoor particulate levels provided they are the right size for your home and filters are changed regularly.

• Consider taking shelter in air-conditioned buildings which have large indoor volumes and limited entry of outdoor air.

Voluntary emission reduction actions:

• Minimize the use of diesel powered equipment.

• Consider taking transit or carpooling rather than driving to your destination.

• Follow local regulations for recreational fires. Avoid lighting a fire where possible.

Additional Information:

• Fine particulates are emitted from transportation sources, non-road engines, heating and burning.

• Fine particulate levels are compared to medium-term (24-hour) objectives.

• Nitrogen oxides are emitted from fuel combustion processes including transportation, boilers, and building heating.

• Volatile organic compounds commonly arise from burning fossil fuels, solvent evaporation (including paint, varnishes and thinners), fuel refining and storage, fuel refilling, and agricultural activities as well as natural sources such as vegetation.

• Ozone levels are compared to short-term (one hour) and medium-term (eight hour) objectives. The short-term objective measures the highest concentration and the medium-term objective represents the average over the period of the day when levels are generally elevated.

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