Volunteers and work crews put the finishing touches on an 800-metre trail linking the Vedder Bridge with the Bridlewood Trail on Chilliwack Laek Road.

Volunteers and work crews put the finishing touches on an 800-metre trail linking the Vedder Bridge with the Bridlewood Trail on Chilliwack Laek Road.

River Edge Trail links Vedder Trail to Bridlewood

A new trail connecting the existing Vedder Bridge and the Bridlewood Trailhead is now complete.

A new trail connecting the existing Vedder Bridge and the Bridlewood Trailhead is now complete.  The trail extends for 800 metres along the Chilliwack River, beside Chilliwack Lake Road.

The new trail was a collaboration between the Rotary Club of Chilliwack Mt Cheam, the City of Chilliwack, and Emil Anderson Construction (EAC).

The project was in a long-term plan for the City but with significant contributions from the other two partners the City decided to fund the River Edge Trail Project this year.  The Rotary Club Community Projects Committee viewed this project as a significant enhancement to the community and a major benefit to trail users and exercise enthusiasts.  The club’s focus over the past few years has been projects that promote health and activity within the community.

The trail was originally planned to be 1.5 metres wide, but funds were sufficient enough to widen the trail width to 2.5 metres.  Environmental and DFO permits were secured by the City of Chilliwack and some widths restrictions were put in place in order to avoid sensitive areas.

EAC completed the majority of the work between May 23 and June 17, allowing the Rotary Club volunteers to put the finishing touches on the trail surface.  The trail will ultimately be connected to the existing Rotary Trail along with the completion of the new Vedder River Bridge. This will allow for uninterrupted flow from Bridlewood Trail to Peach Road and beyond.

The value of the project is estimated at $139,000, with 60 per cent coming from the city, 24 per cent coming from Mt. Cheam Rotary and a District 50/50 grant, and the final 16 per cent coming from Emil Anderson through in-kind work.