A Canada goose wanders around Entrance Bay at Cultus Lake on July 27, 2011. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)

A Canada goose wanders around Entrance Bay at Cultus Lake on July 27, 2011. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)

Managing the geese at Cultus Lake an ongoing challenge

Cultus Lake beaches and grassy shorelines are very appealing to Canada geese who like to graze

It’s been an ongoing challenge to manage the growing goose population at Cultus Lake, according to FVRD Area H director Taryn Dixon, in her report of February 2022.

Cultus Lake beaches and grassy shorelines are very appealing to Canada geese.

“Our Cultus Lake Goose Management Committee is once again up and running,” Dixon wrote. “Our aim is to manage the goose population at Cultus Lake.”

The geese targeted in a 2019 pilot project of nest searching and egg addling were identified as an invasive, non-migratory population.

“If left alone one of our studies indicated their population would become unmanageable within a few short years,” Dixon wrote.

People should always refrain from feeding the geese.

“We are also working with BC Parks, Cultus Lake Park Board and Lindell Beach to modify the beach habitat so it is not quite as attractive to geese.”

The FVRD’s Canada Goose Management Plan points out: “At Cultus Lake the non-migratory Canada goose population is considered a public nuisance.

“They negatively impact natural park habitats and restoration projects, create conflicts with park users, and impact water quality.”

Conflicts include:

• aggressive behaviour of territorial/nesting geese to park users;

• turf damage and fecal deposits on lawns, and park fields;

• fecal deposits in water contributing to increased coliform counts and swimming advisories;

• environmental degradation related to overgrazing of shoreline vegetation (e.g., loss of native

vegetation and increased siltation) and fecal matter in water (e.g., increased pathogens and

biological oxygen demand)

• decreased biodiversity caused by aggressive territorial behaviour that prevents smaller,

native waterfowl from nesting.

See more in the FVRD goose plan:

RELATED: Goose poop a vexing problem

RELATED: Park board on the hunt for goose solution

Do you have something to add to this story, or a news tip? Email:
jfeinberg@theprogress.com


@CHWKjourno
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