ICBC data map of pedestrians struck by cars in Metro Vancouver.

Interactive maps show B.C.’s worst crash locations

ICBC's new online tool displays collision data for each city

Lower Mainland - Crashes at Intersections - 2007 to 2011   Notes about the data ICBC data as of March 31, 2012 * excludes crashes in parking lots and incidents involving parked vehicles * only includes crashes where sufficient location information is avai

Scroll right to change city or adjust controls

Anyone who’s wondered which B.C. intersections are the most dangerous to drive, cycle or walk through can now check online for a new tool.

ICBC has unveiled interactive maps that display its crash data going back up to five years for every local city.

Many of the worst sites in the Lower Mainland are at on- and off-ramps along Highway 1, although other severely crash-prone spots include intersections on King George Highway in Surrey and along heavily traveled north-south corridors in Vancouver.

A city menu lets users choose the community they want to view and the map with crash sites is then displayed, along with a list of intersections with the highest crash counts.

Users can view the mapped crash data from any one of the past five years, or all the years combined. They can also choose to see just casualty crashes, not ones that only caused property damage.

Separate maps prepared by ICBC show data on crashes involving cyclists or pedestrians.

“You can really break it down to the area you live in,” ICBC spokesman Adam Grossman said. “So hopefully a lot of people find it useful.”

He said the auto insurer gets many requests for that data already and decided to make it freely available to save staff and requesters time.

“We’re looking for ways to make our information more transparent and acccessible.”

Grossman added the data doesn’t mean certain intersections themselves are dangerous because of their design.

“It really comes down to driver behaviour at the end of the day,” he said.



Lower Mainland

Vancouver Island

Southern Interior

Northern Central


Pedestrians struck

Cyclists struck (Metro Vancouver and Capital Regional District only)

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