Good move by B.C. to prevent murderers from cashing in: Crey

Ernie Crey of Chilliwack has praise for the legislation on deck to stop criminals from profiting from their horrible crimes

Cheam Chief Ernie Crey of Chilliwack has high praise for the B.C. legislation on deck to stop notorious criminals from profiting from their horrible crimes.

Cheam Chief Ernie Crey of Chilliwack has high praise for the B.C. legislation on deck to stop notorious criminals from profiting from their horrible crimes.

Ernie Crey of Chilliwack has high praise for the B.C. legislation on deck to stop notorious criminals from profiting from their horrible crimes.

Crey, the brother of Dawn Crey, whose DNA was found on the Pickton pig farm, was outraged to hear of a Pickton memoir published recently.

“I support the move by the province to prohibit someone like Robert (Willie) Pickton, or anyone else who has committed a serious crime, to profit by writing books about it,” said Crey.

Other jurisdictions have already passed similar laws, and it was “long overdue” for B.C. he said.

“I commend them for taking this step now,” said Crey.

In the wake of a huge protest, Amazon was forced to remove the online ad for the Pickton book.

“I wanted to make sure people understand my position very clearly,” said Crey, who is also Chief of Cheam First Nation. “It’s been suggested that I supported the banning of books. I don’t. I never called for a book ban.

“I did take exception to the book, and the attempt to market it, but I only tried to frustrate the sale of it.”

Serious criminals should not be able to “cash in” on the anguish of victims and their families, he said.

The province apparently agreed. The Pickton book was a factor in the decision.

“If passed, the Profits of Criminal Notoriety Act will target those who attempt to benefit from the sale of their stories in any written or broadcast form, or from memorabilia related to their crimes,” according to information on the Government of B.C. website about the proposed law.

“Any money would instead be required to be paid to the Province for redistribution to victims or their families, with any surplus amounts used to support victim services.”

The proposed legislation will:

•    Require that parties that enter into a verbal or written contract for recounting of a notorious crime notify government about its terms.

•    Prohibit a person from providing or accepting money or other consideration under such contracts for recounting of a notorious crime.

•    Allow government to apply to court to take profits from sale of crime-related memorabilia.

•    Prevent offenders from assigning rights to another person, like a spouse, friend or relative.