Throughout December, RCMP conducted CounterAttack road checks as police worked to keep roads free of impaired drivers. (BLACK PRESS file photo)

Throughout December, RCMP conducted CounterAttack road checks as police worked to keep roads free of impaired drivers. (BLACK PRESS file photo)

‘You can’t make this stuff up’: Stories from the B.C. CounterAttack campaign

Amusing, yes, but a reminder impaired driving affects ability to drive and to make good decisions

B.C. Mounties recently wrapped up their winter campaign to counter impaired driving, generating new material for the “we don’t make this stuff up” file.

Cpl. Mike Halskov, with BC RCMP traffic services, said Wednesday that police all across the province caught people getting behind the wheel while impaired, including a few repeat offenders.

Here’s a look at a few of the cases:

RELATED: Driver arrested after asking Nanaimo RCMP for advice on avoiding road checks

Driver tries to school officer on roadside laws

A man in Cranbrook found out the hard way that having a history of impaired driving didn’t necessarily mean they were an expert on the particular criminal code offence.

According to police, the man refused to give a breath sample after being pulled over by a “seasoned officer,” insisting that this wasn’t illegal and all the Mountie could do was issue a 90-day roadside prohibition.

“The officer chose to follow the law rather than the driver’s advice and charged him criminally with refusing to provide breath samples,” Halskov said.

Shortly after the driver was dropped off at home, he called the local detachment to report his vehicle stolen.

“Don’t drive impaired and then try to educate the officer on the law – we know our authorities and what we are doing.”

Impaired driver goes through road block twice

On Vancouver Island, officers in the Ladysmith area encountered a driver who came through a road check not once, but twice.

In the first instance, the driver stopped for the officer, but drove off when asked to pull to the side of the road.

“For reasons that can only be attributed to the driver’s impairment, he came through the road check a second time, stopping long enough to hand his driver’s licence to the officer before fleeing again,” Halskov said.

Instead of pursuing the individual in a chase, the officer sent a driving report to RoadSafetyBC. A few days later, the officer attended the driver’s home and served him with numerous violation tickets, as well as a four-month driving prohibition.

“The lesson: Police recommend following directions at a road check but, if you choose not to, the consequences may be worse than if you had,” Halskov said.

While these stories cause a chuckle or two, RCMP are urging all British Columbians to not drive while impaired and report any suspected driving under the influence to police.

“As we have seen many times in the past, the consequences of poor decision making when it comes to impaired driving can be deadly,” Halskov said.

RELATED: Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer


@AlstrT
editor@campbellrivermirror.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

RCMPTraffic

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

(Black Press file photo)
Child in critical condition after Harrison Mills incident, homicide investigators deployed

The child was transported to hospital but is not expected to survive

Immanuel Covenant Reformed Church at 35063 Page Rd. in Abbotsford was among three Fraser Valley churches that the B.C. government tried to get a court injunction against for holding in-person services. (Google Maps)
B.C. churches in court to attempt to overturn ban on in-person services

A judge will hear arguments Monday through Wednesday

Chilliwack's David Leger couldn't see Mt. Cheam for all the smog back in 1998, and that led him to eventually found Loop Energy, a pioneer in hydrogen fuel-cell technology. (Facebook photo)
Loop Energy: How a humble Chilliwack startup became a multi-million dollar fuel cell pioneer

This is part 1 of a 3-part series on the rise of Loop Energy, now being traded publically on the TSX

Hospital outbreaks included in Fraser Health update Feb. 28, 2021. (Black Press file)
Fraser Health declares COVID-19 outbreaks at Chilliwack General and Surrey Memorial

The medicine units are temporarily closed but ERs remain open, according to Fraser Health update

Island Health chief medical officer Dr. Richard Stanwick receives a first dose of Pfizer vaccine, Dec. 22, 2020. (B.C. government)
COVID-19 vaccination set to start for B.C. seniors aged 80-plus

Long-term care residents protected by shots already given

A GoFundMe campaign for Riley Stevens and his family has raised more than $5,700 since launching last week. (Contributed photo)
White Rock mom of sick tot ‘totally blown away’ by donations, offers help

GoFundMe campaign to help family of Riley Stevens crests $5,700

Sewage plant in Lower Mainland, operated by Metro Vancouver. (Metro Vancouver screenshot)
‘Poop tracker’ launches as researchers test Lower Mainland sewage water for COVID-19

‘Studying the virus in wastewater allows researchers to look at an entire population…’

(Pxhere)
Compensation fund opens for B.C. students negatively affected by incorrect exam marks

Marks for 2019 provincial exams were incorrectly tabulated

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Inez Louis, who is strategic operations planner with the health department in the Sto:lo Service Agency, talks about infection control in the latest YouTube video about COVID-19 created in partnership with the Chilliwack Division of Family Practice and the Chilliwack Economic Recovery Network. (YouTube)
VIDEO: Nurse Inez Louis explains how infection control is not social control

The difference is important for Indigenous people to hear in the context of Canada’s colonial past

The humanoid sensing robot has a 3D printed finger cap that measures oxygen levels. (Dr. Woo Soo Kim)
Medical care robots being made with 3D origami in B.C. lab

Would you let a robot take your temperature?

B.C. Premier Gordon Campbell gets acquainted with Tsawwassen First Nation Chief Kim Baird’s 10-month-old daughter Sophia, husband Steve and four-year-old Amy at the B.C. legislature before a ceremony to endorse the Tsawwassen Treaty, Oct. 15, 2007. (Sharon Tiffin/Black Press)
Indigenous consent must come first and last for B.C. industrial projects

UN declaration seen as end to a history of horror stories

Most Read