Crey has some suggestions for national inquiry

First, the national inquiry should be led by Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, Crey said. She's B.C.'s rep of children and youth.

Ernie Crey of Chilliwack has been pushing for a national inquiry on missing and murdered indigenous women for a long time. Aside from his role as policy advisor to Sto:lo Tribal Council on fisheries issues

Ernie Crey of Chilliwack has been pushing for a national inquiry on missing and murdered indigenous women for a long time. Aside from his role as policy advisor to Sto:lo Tribal Council on fisheries issues

Ernie Crey of Chilliwack has been pushing for a national inquiry on missing and murdered women for a long time.

So it’s not at all surprising that he has carefully considered what he’d like to see now that an inquiry looks more likely under the newly elected Trudeau government.

Aside from his role as policy advisor to Sto:lo Tribal Council on fisheries issues, his sister Dawn Crey is also listed among the missing. Her DNA was found at the Pickton farm, although the farmer was never charged with her murder.

“So this issue has touched me personally,” Crey said.

He has a number of suggestions now that a glimmer of hope has been rekindled among families with missing or murdered aboriginal women, in the wake of the recent federal election.

One, the national inquiry should ideally be led by Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, Crey said. Turpel-Lafond fought and advocated valiantly for children since being appointed in 2006, and re-appointed to another term, as the province’s representative of children and youth.

Two, he suggested the inquiry should touch down and travel to different regions of Canada to collect testimony from witnesses, including several sessions in B.C.

Three, it should be broadcast on CPAC or otherwise online with highlights on the evening news to keep the issue alive and in the public eye.

jfeinberg@theprogress.com

twitter.com/chwkjourno