IHIT officers on scene at the Langley Township apartment building where the body of Aaliyah Rosa was found in July, 2018. (Langley Advance Times files)

IHIT officers on scene at the Langley Township apartment building where the body of Aaliyah Rosa was found in July, 2018. (Langley Advance Times files)

COVID, health delays won’t stop Langley murder trial, judge says

The trial of KerryAnn Lewis is to resume Dec. 14

WARNING: This story may contain disturbing content

The accused in a Langley child murder case is fit to continue with the trial, a judge decided Friday, but COVID-19 and other health issues have already caused multiple delays.

The accused, KerryAnn Lewis, was examined by phone by a doctor with the Forensic Psychiatric Service Friday morning, Justice Martha Devlin was told in a New Westminster courtroom.

The doctor did not see any reason why Lewis was not fit to continue with the trial, despite the fact that Lewis collapsed in court on Wednesday morning.

“Our instructions are that she [Lewis] wishes to proceed,” said Marilyn Sandford, the defense lawyer.

Lewis has pleaded not guilty to a charge of first degree murder in the death of her seven-year-old daughter Aaliyah Rosa.

Aaliyah was found dead inside Lewis’s Langley apartment on July 22, 2018. The Crown prosecutors said at the outset of the case that they intend to prove that Lewis sedated and then drowned Aaliyah in the apartment bathtub.

Multiple witnesses have testified that Lewis had been upset about her lack of access to her daughter, who lived with her father.

READ MORE: Accused in Langley child-murder trial collapses in court

READ MORE: Accused wanted to die to be together with her daughter, witness testifies

On Wednesday, Nov. 18, Lewis fainted in court shortly after Devlin had announced plans to pause the trial to have the accused seen by a doctor.

A loud thud was audible over the audio link to the trial, and court staff called for emergency medical personnel to check Lewis out.

She was apparently speaking after her collapse, and was seen by paramedics in courthouse cells.

The incident was the latest in a series of health-related delays that have struck the trial, involving both Lewis, who has been too ill to attend court on a few days, as well as witnesses.

Multiple witnesses, including one of the Emergency Health Services paramedics, have been diagnosed with COVID-19 or have had to quarantine after an exposure.

The latest to be affected was the toxicology expert who was scheduled to testify on Friday morning, but was awaiting a COVID test result after developing symptoms, the court heard.

Sandford noted that there was no sign the COVID-related problems would dissipate by mid-December, when the trial is scheduled to resume.

“It’s possible the COVID situation may actually be worse,” she noted.

Devlin insisted the trial would conclude despite the delays.

“It will take the time it takes,” the judge said.

The trial is now scheduled to resume on Dec. 14 for a week of testimony.

“Hopefully, everyone will stay healthy until then,” said Devlin.

The judge is expected to hear from paramedics, the toxicologist, and staff at two stores where Lewis stopped with Aaliyah the morning before the child’s death, including a drug store and a liquor store.

If the trial takes longer, Devlin said a week can be reserved in January to finish hearing the evidence.

CourtIHITLangleymurder

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Rendering of proposed homeless shelter and supportive housing facility on Rowat Avenue and Trethewey Avenue in Chilliwack. (BC Housing)
Supportive housing and shelter proposed to replace the Portal in Chilliwack

Province looking to fast-track hybrid proposal for 50 supportive homes and 40 shelter spaces

Loop Energy’s first engineer, Vance Chou (right), working with a National Research Council colleague to test one of the first fuel-cell prototypes at the Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation in 2002. (Loop Energy photos)
Loop Energy: Chilliwack fuel-cell startup hits bumps on road to success

This is part two of a 3-part series on the rise of Loop Energy, now being traded publicly on the TSX

Megan Owens helped launch Inclusion Revolution Sports in 2018 and visited several local elementary schools to talk about inclusion and diversity. (Instagram photo)
Chilliwack’s Megan Owens champions diversity through Inclusion Revolution Sports

The G.W. Graham grad is fired up for Spread the Word Inclusion Global Day of Activation on March 3

Island Health chief medical officer Dr. Richard Stanwick receives a first dose of Pfizer vaccine, Dec. 22, 2020. (B.C. government)
COVID-19: B.C. seniors aged 90+ can start to sign up for vaccination on March 8

Long-term care residents protected by shots already given

Churches, including Langley's Riverside Calvary Church, are challenging the regulations barring them from holding in-person worship services during COVID-19. (Langley Advance Times file)
Langley resident Carrie MacKay shared a video showing how stairs are a challenge after spending weeks in hospital battling COVID-19 (Special to Langley Advance Times)
VIDEO: Stairs a challenge for B.C. woman who chronicled COVID-19 battle

‘I can now walk for six (to) 10 minutes a day’

Left: Oakland County Jail. Right: Vancouver Canucks Todd Bertuzzi on this November 2. (CP/Chuck Stoody)
Former Vancouver Canuck Todd Bertuzzi arrested for suspected DUI: report

The Canadian winger had a complicated history during his time in the NHL

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

The south coast of B.C. as capture by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission. (European Space Agency)
VIDEO: Images of B.C.’s south coast from space released by European Space Agency

The satellite images focus on a variety of the region’s landmarks

A copy of the book “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street,” by Dr. Seuss, rests in a chair, Monday, March 1, 2021, in Walpole, Mass. Dr. Seuss Enterprises, the business that preserves and protects the author and illustrator’s legacy, announced on his birthday, Tuesday, March 2, 2021, that it would cease publication of several children’s titles including “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street” and “If I Ran the Zoo,” because of insensitive and racist imagery. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
6 Dr. Seuss books won’t be published for racist images

Books affected include McElligot’s Pool, On Beyond Zebra!, Scrambled Eggs Super! and The Cat’s Quizzer

FILE – Oshawa Generals forward Anthony Cirelli, left, shoots and scores his team’s first goal against Kelowna Rockets goalie Jackson Whistle during second period action at the Memorial Cup final in Quebec City on Sunday, May 31, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jacques Boissinot
B.C. government approves plan in principle to allow WHL to resume in the province

League includes Kamloops Blazers, Kelowna Rockets, Prince George Cougars, Vancouver Giants, Victoria Royals

The fundraising effort to purchase 40 hectares west of Cottonwood Lake announced its success this week. Photo: Submitted
Nelson society raises $400K to save regional park from logging project

The Nelson community group has raised $400,000 to purchase 40 hectares of forest

Most Read