Nitrogen trifluoride is a greenhouse has 17,200 more potent than carbon monoxide. (Taiyu Industrial Gas)

UPDATED: B.C. seeks study on a particularly powerful greenhouse gas

Province wants info on nitrogen trifluoride, which is 17,000 times more potent than carbon monoxide

The province is spending up to $10,000 to see how much of a particular greenhouse gas is being emitted by businesses.

In a request for proposal issued earlier this month, the environment ministry says it’s looking to quantify emissions of nitrogen trifluoride, a colourless, odorless, nonflammable gas that’s used in the production of microelectronics, predominantly in flat-panel displays, such as TVs, and thin-film solar cells.

As a greenhouse gas, it’s 17,200 times more potent than carbon monoxide.

UBC atmospheric sciences professor Douw Steyn says he’s surprised.

“I didn’t know we had much of an electronic manufacturing sector,” said Steyn. The province has a booming tech sector, he added, but that’s largely software.

The study falls in line with Canada’s pledge to monitor nitrogen trifluoride as part of its climate change commitments to the United Nations, Steyn said, and when the results come in, staff will be able to put B.C. emissions in context with those from other provinces and other countries.

“The current measurements tell us that it’s predominantly coming from the northern hemisphere,” he said.

Nitrogen trifluoride emissions stay in the atmosphere for 750 years, he said, and depletes the ozone layer.

An environment ministry spokesperson told Black Press that the province has a target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80 per cent by 2050.

Currently, the province does not measure nitrogen trifluoride emissions.

The $10,000 price tag will cover a look at the options for conducting the study, B.C.’s levels of emissions for various industries, the cost of reporting emissions for facilities, and technologies and practices for mitigating emissions.


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Six Sto:lo chiefs sign MOU agreement affirming Indigenous rights

Moving to next phase of nation-to-nation negotiation in preparation for final treaty

Chilliwack Chiefs sit atop BCHL standings

No one expected the young Chiefs to be this good this fast, but can it last?

‘Police are ready’ for legal pot, say Canadian chiefs

But Canadians won’t see major policing changes as pot becomes legal

On Oct. 19, gospel musician, Rob Berg, hosts first concert in Chilliwack in 25 years

Held at the Sardis Community Church, the concert celebrates his career and new album release

Outgoing Chilliwack board chair says anti-SOGI trustees won’t be allowed in schools

Candidates’ anti-LGBTQ rhetoric makes for awkward situations with students, teachers, administrators

Naked man jumping into Toronto shark tank a ‘premeditated’ stunt: official

The man swam in a tank at Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada

Transport Canada to take new look at rules, research on school bus seatbelts

Canada doesn’t currently require seatbelts on school buses

Sockeye run in Shuswap expected to be close to 2014 numbers

Salute to the Sockeye on Adams River continues until Sunday, Oct. 21 at 4 p.m.

Michelle Mungall’s baby first in B.C. legislature chamber

B.C. energy minister praises support of staff, fellow MLAs

B.C. man who abducted and assaulted 11-year-old girl has parole rules tightened

Brian Abrosimo made ‘inappropriate and sexualized’ comments to female staff

Canucks: Pettersson in concussion protocol, Beagle out with broken forearm

Head coach Travis Green called the hit ‘a dirty play’

5 tips for talking to your kids about cannabis

Health officials recommend sharing a harm reduction-related message.

Elderly pedestrian killed in Burnaby collision

Police are looking for witnesses

Most Read