(Pixabay)

B.C. has highest C-section rate in Canada: report

Researcher says it’s not necessarily a bad thing

B.C. has the highest number of babies delivered by caesarean section in the country and it continues to rise, a new report says.

At 35.3 per cent, B.C. outstrips second-place Newfoundland and Labrador by five percentage points, according to the Canadian Institute for Health Information. The province is more than 10 points higher than the lowest rates found in the Northwest Territories, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

And Sarah Munro, a UBC postdoctoral researcher and scientist with the Centre for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, said that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

”At an individual level… increasing rates of C-sections may be evidence that women are making informed, intelligent, rational choices for caesarean sections with the information that they have,” Munro said.

But taking in general look raises some concerns, she said, especially since it’s not yet known why B.C.’s rate continues to rise faster than that of any other province.

“At a population health level, we know that a higher C-section rate means more potential for bad outcomes associated with major surgery,” said Munro.

“Increased risk of infection, increased risk of potential breathing issues for the baby and it also makes it harder for women to have more vaginal birth in the future.”

In B.C., 83 per cent of the women who have a C-section will go onto to have another, according to the CIHI report.

Although that’s not quite the highest number for that trend in the country, because of the higher rates of C-sections to begin with, she said it does mean more women in B.C. have more repeat C-sections than women anywhere else.

“The single, biggest predictor of a Caesarean delivery is a previous Caesarean,” said Munro. “In B.C., nearly one-in-three Caesareans are among women who have had a previous Caesarean.”

Just Posted

Chilliwack athletes run in the rain at first cross-country race

Dozens of elementary/middle/high schoolers tackled a mucky course next to Twin Rinks last Thursday.

Fraser River First Nations say they aren’t getting their share of sockeye

Shortage is a result of decisions made by DFO, not a shortage of sockeye, complaint says

Chilliwack Chiefs benefit from BCHL Showcase exposure

Carter Wilkie’s first BCHL goal Saturday against Wenatchee earned him talks with several NCAA scouts.

Surging Okanagan Sun stop slumping Valley Huskers

A blocked punt set the tone for the Sun in a BC Football Conference game at the Apple Bowl.

Horse trainer suing Chilliwack feed mill after death of five animals

Alicia Harper seeking $500,000 to $1 million in losses and damages from Hi-Pro Feeds

Video: Flyers new mascot ‘Gritty’ a bearded, googly-eyed terror

The Philadelphia Flyers unveiled their new mascot Monday, and as one would expect of the team that gave us the “Broad Street Bullies,” he’s far from cuddly.

Harvest Moon to light up B.C. skies with an ‘autumn hue’

It’s the first moon after the autumn equinox

Hockey league gets $1.4M for assistance program after Humboldt Broncos crash

Program will help players, families, coaches and volunteers after the shock of the deadly crash

Canada has removed six out of 900 asylum seekers already facing U.S. deportation

Ottawa had said the ‘overwhelming majority’ had been removed

Appeal pipeline decision but consult Indigenous communities, Scheer says

The federal appeals court halted the Trans Mountain expansion last month

B.C. electric vehicle subsidy fund drains faster than expected

Province adds another $10 million to incentive fund

‘I’ll never forgive you:’ Victim impact statements at hearing for Calgary killer

Curtis Healy was found guilty of first-degree murder Friday in the death of Dawns Baptiste.

Man accused of mailing bomb to his brother in B.C. has died

Leon Nepper was found in ‘medical distress’ at the Whitehorse Correctional Centre on Sunday

Most Read