B.C. company files patent for real-life Harry Potter ‘Invisibility Cloak’

Previously developed state of the art camo wear

The Maple Ridge company that says it’s invented an invisible cloak has now applied for four patents for its high-tech no-vis gear.

Hyperstealth Biotechnology Corp., said in an Oct. 8 news release, that the four applications are all related to its Quantum Stealth light-bending material, also known as the Invisibility Cloak.

That technology was previously announced in 2011, drawing widespread media attention.

One patent application is for the light-bending material, that bends ultraviolet, infra-red, and visible light rays, making an object invisible.

According to the release, the material is paper thin and needs no power source and “can hide a person, a vehicle, a ship, spacecraft and buildings.”

The company refers readers to videos on its website for more information.

The applications for the other patents are for solar power amplifier, a display system that can produce holographic images, and a laser system.

Hyperstealth CEO Guy Cramer said Wednesday that the material is not ready to be commercialized yet “as we only have crude prototypes.

“The manufactured versions will be better and clearer then those seen in the videos. We are now looking into the manufacturing side as the next stage of progression with the technologies,” Cramer said.

Hyperstealth developed the light-bending technology after developing digital patterns for uniforms uniforms.

The material renders the target invisible by bending light waves around it, just as light bends in fibre-optic cables, Cramer said in 2012.

A president of a Vancouver security firm, was at presentations in 2012 and said the device works.

The product also was demonstrated to Canadian military officials in Ottawa as well, but no defence contract was signed.

Cramer has made several presentations to military organizations around the world, offering the technology to the U.S. military, which has not adopted it.

“I am still baffled by the lack of movement, particularity by the U.S. military as this inexpensive material renders almost every optical advantage they now have as obsolete; visible, ultraviolet, near infrared, short wave infrared and thermal,” Cramer said online.

“Why would the U.S. give up a huge advantage and potentially place themselves at a disadvantage?” he asked. Cramer said he has been careful about letting the technology get into the wrong hands but added he now wants to protect the inventions via patents but which will also open up the product to commercialization.



pmelnychuk@mapleridgenews.com

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