Map shows Simpcw First Nation’s traditional territory extending north past McBride and east into what is now Jasper National Park. Simpcw First Nation graphic

Another B.C. First Nation voices support for Kinder Morgan pipeline

Simpcw First Nation claims people living on one-third of pipeline route support the project

The chief and council of a First Nation in B.C.’s southern interior has joined the chorus of voices supporting the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

“After seeing what’s out there in the media, council decided that it’s important we speak out,” said Simpcw Chief Nathan Matthew in a release Monday.

Simpcw First Nation, formerly known as North Thompson Indian Band, is one of the communities who have signed a Mutual Benefits Agreement with Kinder Morgan.

One-third of the pipeline traverses Simpcw territory, the release said, making it the First Nation with the greatest amount of land that the pipeline will pass, and arguably, one of the Nations who stands to be most affected by the project.

“That means one-third of the pipeline has the support of the Nation who holds Aboriginal title to the land,” Matthew said.

READ MORE: Cycle relay seeks to raise pipeline awareness

READ MORE: Chilliwack-area chief touts economic benefits of pipeline deal

The process that led to the signing of the MBA was not a simple or hasty one, he added. It took two years.

“Our job as chief and council was to do our due diligence, conduct our own environmental assessment review, and negotiate the best deal we could for the community,” he said. “After that, all of our work was presented to the community and the agreement went to a codified referendum process.”

Seventy-eight per cent of voters were in favour of executing the benefits agreement with Kinder Morgan.

“If the project does not go ahead, we will lose out on opportunities that we have been working hard at obtaining in the last year or so,” said Simpcw councillor Don Matthew.

Nathan Matthew also pointed out that John Horgan has not reached out to the Simpcw, suggesting it’s because they do not agree with the premier’s stance against the pipeline.

“First Nations ought to have a role in the discussions happening between the federal and provincial governments right now,” the chief said.

“Premier Horgan’s approach to opposing the project at this stage in the game without any discussion or involvement of Indigenous Nations affected by, and/or invested in, the project is an example of what not to do.”



newsroom@clearwatertimes.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Cookie’s Grill owners help Meals on Wheels keep rolling in Chilliwack

Colleen and Colin Connolly are working hard to get food to seniors and others in need of a good meal

Chilliwack hospital offers thank-you message to community

Chilliwack health-care workers say they have heard everyone’s support throughout COVID-19 pandemic

UPDATE: Vehicle crash leaves 1,200 Chilliwack BC Hydro customers in the dark

Motor vehicle incident involving power pole could leave Fairfield Island residents in dark until 7:30 p.m.

Organ donation gives Fraser Valley RCMP officer a second chance at life

Cathleen Falebrinza celebrates Green Shirt Day after receiving a double lung transplant in 2016.

From tennis to basketball to pickleball all sports courts closed in Chilliwack

City of Chilliwack closed all facilities in town to encourage folks adhere to physical distancing

COVID-19: 4 new deaths, 25 new cases but only in Vancouver Coastal, Fraser Health

A total of 1,291 people have tested positive for the novel coronavirus

COVID-19: Don’t get away for Easter weekend, Dr. Bonnie Henry warns

John Horgan, Adrian Dix call 130 faith leaders as holidays approach

COVID-19: Trudeau says 30K ventilators on the way; 3.6M Canadians claim benefits

Canada has seen more than 17,000 cases and at least 345 deaths due to COVID-19

RCMP call on kids to name latest foal recruits

The baby horses names are to start with the letter ‘S’

As Canadians return home amid pandemic, border crossings dip to just 5% of usual traffic

Non-commercial land crossing dipped by 95%, air travel dropped by 96 per cent, according to the CBSA

Logan Boulet Effect: Green Shirt Day calls on Canadians to become organ donors

While social distancing, the day also honours the 16 lives lost in the 2018 Humboldt Broncos Crash

COMMENTARY: Knowing where COVID-19 cases are does not protect you

Dr. Bonnie Henry explains why B.C. withholds community names

B.C. wide burning restrictions come into effect April 16

‘Larger open burns pose an unnecessary risk and could detract from wildfire detection’

Most Read