Dog dies after airline worker has it placed in overhead bin

United Airlines has taken full responsibility for the tragedy

A dog died on a United Airlines plane after a flight attendant ordered its owner to put the animal in the plane’s overhead bin.

United said Tuesday that it took full responsibility for the incident on the Monday night flight from Houston to New York.

In a statement, United called it “a tragic accident that should never have occurred, as pets should never be placed in the overhead bin.”

The dog was in a small pet carrier designed to fit under an airline seat.

Passengers reported that they heard barking during the flight and didn’t know that the dog had died until the plane landed at LaGuardia Airport.

Passenger Maggie Gremminger posted a photo on Twitter of the dog’s owner and children after the flight. “I want to help this woman and her daughter. They lost their dog because of an @united flight attendant. My heart is broken,” she wrote.

United spokesman Charles Hobart said the flight attendant told the dog’s owner to put the pet carrier in the overhead bin because the bag was partly obstructing the aisle. It is unclear why the carrier was not placed under a seat, he said.

Hobart said United is investigating the incident and talking to the flight attendant, whom he declined to identify. He said the airline refunded the tickets purchased for the dog owner and her two children and the fee that they paid to bring a pet on board — typically $200.

The cause of the dog’s death was not immediately known. The spokesman said Chicago-based United offered to pay for a necropsy.

Last year, 18 animals died while being transported on United — there were six cases on all other U.S. carriers combined, according to the Department of Transportation.

United has suffered a string of incidents that generated bad publicity in the last two years, including the violent removal of a passenger from a United Express plane to make room for a crew member, and the death of a giant rabbit — its Iowa owners sued the airline, which they said cremated the animal to destroy evidence about the cause of death.

David Koenig, The Associated Press

Just Posted

Home sales finally cooling in Chilliwack

But locally softening in market compares to big drops to the west

Chilliwack students give ‘mindfulness’ a chance

Alt-ed school leading the way in anxiety reduction strategies

Chilliwack RCMP looking for $70,000 in stolen collector cash

Missing money in Canadian and Chinese denominations

BCHL bringing back the shootout

The junior A league approved changes to the overtime format at its recent annual general meeting.

BCHL officiating guru takes national role with CJHL

Retired National Hockey League linesman Brad Lazarowich is helping develop junior A officials.

Trudeau, Horgan condemn controversial U.S. child migrant policy

Premier John Horgan said B.C. ‘will always stand up for the values’ of diversity and inclusion

Special invites sent for Canucks Autism Network’s 10th birthday party in July

Such invitations are rare for some kids with autism, and one Surrey family knows the feeling

Heat records broken across B.C. as weather warning lifts

Thirteen records broken across B.C. on Tuesday

Police reissue request for help in identifying South Surrey taxi robbery suspect

Armed man threatened driver near 160 Street and 20 Avenue, police say

Streaking fan levelled by BC Lions player hires lawyer

Toronto-based firm says the fan suffered injuries including a ‘mild traumatic brain injury’

Person involved in B.C. crash must wait longer to get their blood back

Judge extends blood seizure order as police conduct Surrey impaired driving investigation

Province expected to extend fish farm licenses another 4 years

An announcement on future of 20 fish farms off B.C. coast coming Wednesday afternoon

5 to start your day

Ultra low-cost airline launches in B.C., massage therapist charged with sex assault and more

Vancouver massage therapist charged with sex assault

Police say they believe more victims are out there

Most Read