Brigida Crosbie announces run to become the mayor of Chilliwack

Brigida Crosbie announced she is running for mayor based on the need for change at city hall to tackle some of Chilliwack’s most challenging issues.

“There are so many things that demand our attention and it is important to keep fighting for what is good and right,” said Crosbie in a news release. “The need for real solutions and strong leadership is at an all-time high.”

Crosbie has been a resident of Chilliwack for more than three decades, a long-time health care worker, and a business owner for almost 25 years.

READ MORE: Last run was in 2014

She counts perseverance and leadership among her strengths, and previously ran for a city council seat in 2014 and came in fifteenth of 17 council candidates

“I am strong and I am not easily discouraged. My strength comes from my unwavering faith. I have always advocated fiercely for what and whom I believe in. I offer hope and a brighter future to all voters,” she said.

With a background in nursing, she’s been employed by Fraser Health for 32 years, primarily in the Chilliwack General Hospital, Crosbie said she brings a level of understanding and compassion to the table that is needed to tackle some of the city’s current most challenging issues.

Key concerns in the upcoming Chilliwack election include addiction, mental health, and homelessness. While some people only see the obvious, she said she has the training and experience to treat the person and situation as a whole.

“I am following my heart and who I am; who I have always been. I have a pure heart that is marked by transparency and an uncompromising desire to reach out and help others.”

As the CEO of Cheeki Cherry, Crosbie said she has worked extensively to promote social justice, equality, international human rights, sexual and gender-based violence, LQBTQ equal rights, women’s rights, domestic and family abuse, and healing within family units, while keeping the family intact.

She also gained experience serving on the The Autism Society board in Vancouver, as well as a stint with the BC Special Olympics. Her compassion drove her to start Coats for Kids in Chilliwack about 18 years ago, helping those in need. She also is the former owner of Neat Repeats, a clothing company focused on getting women back into the work force after leaving domestic violence.

“When I ran for municipal office four years ago, I was told 3,100 people ate at the Salvation Army in the month of October. Some were homeless; some low income and some were seniors,” she said.

READ MORE: Chamber asking for election opinions

Crosbie is also the CEO and founder of Community Angels Home Care and Community Support which she founded after she saw a need for seniors care in the community.

READ MORE: File closed on election questions


@CHWKjourno
jfeinberg@theprogress.com

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Jennifer Feinberg

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