The secret to happiness is helping others

Support people with abilities as a Community Support Worker

Where to start?

In a world full of blurred lines and questions about right and wrong, it is nice to know one thing with absolute certainty: helping others is important, worthwhile and vital for a community to flourish. At times, it can be overwhelming to feel like such a small person in a vast world of troubles. Where does one start? While one person cannot take on the whole world, one person’s contribution can and will make a world of difference.

If you are someone who wants to make a difference but does not know where to start, start in your own community. This might change your life, and in turn, the lives of others. It is amazing how big of an effect a local initiative can have, and there are people in your community who need your assistance. Individuals with developmental disabilities are strong, capable people with wants and needs like everybody else – they just require a little extra help achieving those goals.

A Community Support Worker (CSW) sees the ability, not the disability. A CSW also knows that every person, regardless of their age, gender, or exceptionalities, has the right to a full and happy life. If you believe that everyone has talents, something valuable to offer, and you want to create an inclusive and enriching environment for adults with developmental disabilities, consider Stenberg College’s CSW program.

What does a CSW do?

This is not a career that can simply be described through a job title. There is so much depth to the field that a mere phrase cannot capture the essence of what it means to help someone live the life they want to live. Doug Tennant is the Executive Director of Semiahmoo House Society, which is an inclusive non-profit that provides quality services to those with disabilities. He describes the career passionately and logically:

“At the end of the day, it’s not rocket science. If we can assume that everybody has hopes and dreams and wants to be a part of the community, then our job becomes making those dreams a reality. If we go in with this assumption, then it’s easy.”

CSWs help those with disabilities realize their full potential. By taking a person-centred approach, asking people what they want, and developing programs around those desires, CSWs help adults with developmental disabilities advocate for their aspirations. It is an incredibly rewarding career where you support people to become the best and happiest versions of themselves.

Click here to continue reading about CSWs and the differences they make.

 

Comments are closed

Just Posted

UFV baseball coach returns to pro ranks

Jordan Lennerton, who also coaches at ‘The Yard’ in Chilliwack, played 1 game for the Quebec Capitales

Camp Ignite aims to inspire future first responders

Four-day camp offers young women a chance to experience the challenges of being a first responder

General aviation traffic down to a trickle at Chilliwack Airport

Minimum visibility guidelines can’t be met when conditions are so smoky you can’t see the mountains

At least 14 illegal fires set between Chilliwack and Hope this month

Conservation officers are fed up with people not listening to the province-wide fire ban

Surging Valley Huskers stun Okanagan Sun

The perenial doormat Huskers beat the perenial powerhouse Sun 22-18 in Chilliwack Saturday night.

Social media, digital photography allow millennials to flock to birdwatching

More young people are flocking to birdwatching than ever, aided by social media, digital photography

Former Trump aide Paul Manafort found guilty of eight charges

A mistrial has been declared for the other 10 charges against him

Canada’s team chasing elusive gold medal at women’s baseball World Cup

Canada, ranked No. 2 behind Japan, opens play Wednesday against No. 10 Hong Kong

Lower Mainland animals feeling effects of smoky skies

Animal shelters are trying to keep their critters healthy through the smoggy days.

Former B.C. detective gets 20 months in jail for kissing teen witnesses

James Fisher, formerly with Vancouver police department, pleaded guilty to three charges in June

Former B.C. premier Christy Clark criticizes feds for buying pipeline

The $4.5 billion purchase of Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline second worst decision, she said

‘Takes more courage to fail’: B.C. ultra-marathon swimmer reflects on cancelled try at record

Susan Simmons halted her swim from Victoria to Port Angeles and back because of hypothermia

Animals moved from B.C. Interior shelters to make way for pets displaced by wildfires

The Maple Ridge SPCA houses animals to make space for pets evacuated from B.C.’s burning interior.

$21.5 million medical pot plant to be built in B.C.

The facility is to be built in Princeton

Most Read