Spice up your garden with herbs

Fresh herbs add a flavourful dimension to any garden

  • Jun. 9, 2018 7:30 a.m.

Brian Minter

Special to The Progress

Along with the growth in our culinary diversity, there’s been quite a resurgence in the demand for fresh herbs to add new flavours and zest. They not only have delightful and useful foliage, but their fragrance and flowers can also be a welcome addition to any garden or patio. One of the key things to understand about herbs is the difference between perennial varieties that come back year after year and annual herbs that are more tender and should only be planted out in late May / early June. Perennial herbs can be harvested all year round while most annual herbs will finish in late September or early October.

In the new reality of small space and balcony gardens, herbs adapt easily to both situations. They are among the easiest of plants to grow and are incredibly tolerant of neglect. Even so, they will perform and look far more beautiful with a little care and attention.

I’m a big fan of growing herbs in containers, and I love to combine them with annuals or perennials. One of the first considerations, however, is the style of the container. Size does matter, and the larger the better. Good-sized containers hold more soil and moisture and require less watering, a bonus during the hot, dry months of summer. If you intend to grow the hardier herbs year-round, make sure you purchase a frost proof container or at least ask for ‘well fired’ pots that will withstand modest to heavy frost. Move containers under eaves to minimize excessive moisture in the soil from winter rains and to prevent your pots from cracking.

There is a huge trend toward growing organically, and it’s much easier today with a greater selection of organic products that are more reasonably priced and very effective. The soil you select for your containers should be both well draining and moisture retaining. I always look for professional soil blends rather than shopping price, and I add 20 percent organic matter, like composted manures and ‘Sea Soil’. Many totally organic soils are now readily available, but make sure they will drain well.

Two important considerations are nutrients and pest control. Weekly applications of an organic fertilizer will do the trick, but in hot summer weather an application at each watering will make a huge difference. Fortunately, most herbs are not troubled with many insect problems, except for aphids that can be easily washed off with a gentle spray of water or kept in check by a few doses of ‘Safer’s Soap’ products. Powdery mildew is always a challenging disease for herbs, especially in wet weather. I’ve found that organic ‘Defense’ is a great control. Keeping your plants a little drier, rather than too wet, and watering in the morning so the foliage is dry at night is the best way to prevent diseases and keep your herbs clean and fresh.

When choosing herbs, select the varieties you know and use most frequently. Parsley, both the ‘Double Moss Curled’ and the single leafed ‘Italian’, is delightful in a range of dishes from soups and stews to lightly braised vegetables and egg dishes. It also makes a great garnish and breath freshener.

Chives are some of the hardiest and most ancient of all herbs. I love garlic chives added to cheese dishes, salads, herb butters and sour cream dips. In spring the pink puffy flowers of chives are edible and nice to sprinkle on salads. Mint can be invasive but is better behaved in containers. Today, we have many varieties of mint, ranging from apple and chocolate to orange and spearmint, and they are very popular as garnishes and in drinks and teas. Mojito mint anyone? They will also spice up salads, soups and meats.

Oregano and marjoram are plant cousins and very similar in flavour. Both are used in Mediterranean and Middle East cuisines. Oregano is often used in potpourris.

Thyme also has a unique perfume, and lemon thyme is becoming very popular because of its wonderful flavouring in soups and sauces, especially in Italian dishes. Thyme will also enhance the flavour of fish, poultry and pork.

Basil is the most sought after annual herb because of its great relationship with the tomato and all its sauces. Basil should never be planted out before early June as it needs to have hot, dry weather to minimize damping off.

Rosemary is one of the most beautiful of all herbs with its many trailing and upright forms and captivating perfume. In warmer areas, zone 6 and higher, it can stay out all winter with a little protection. A few sprigs of rosemary will lift meats, like lamb and pork, stews and stuffing to a new level. Rosemary ‘Arp’ is one of the hardiest varieties; R. ‘Roman Beauty’ is the most delicately shaped; and R. ‘Irene Renzels’ has the most delightful trailing form for hanging baskets.

Cilantro (it is really coriander) has been cherished for thousands of years. For a continuous crop, you can collect its seeds as it bolts, and it reseeds easily in containers. For a fresh supply, you need to keep planting every few weeks all summer long.

These are, by far, the most popular and delightful of all herbs, and it’s hard to imagine a small balcony or garden without them.

Just Posted

Excel Martial Arts raises more than $5,000 for family of Chilliwack man killed in workplace accident

By-donation fundraiser event helps wife, three children of 28-year-old Nathan Appleton of Chilliwack

Chilliwack Lions Club has a new place to call home

After more than five years without a headquarters, Chilliwack Lions Club moves into new hall

Sardis Falcons top Heritage Woods in field lacrosse opener

The Falcons rallied from a halftime hole to take a big win on the road in Port Moody.

Chilliwack prolific offender charged in four alleged incidents in 12 days

Branden Tanner busted for alleged smash-and-grab Nov. 30, then incidents Dec. 3, Dec. 8 and Dec. 11

Four companies vying to open cannabis stores in locations across Chilliwack

Rezoning applications for non-medical cannabis outlets pending, and some will require variances

Trudeau to make it harder for future PM to reverse Senate reforms

Of the 105 current senators, 54 are now independents who have banded together in Independent Senators’ Group

Boeser has 2 points as Canucks ground Flyers 5-1

WATCH: Vancouver has little trouble with slumping Philly side

Man dies after falling from B.C. bridge

Intoxicated man climbed railing, lost his balance and fell into the water below

Hundreds attend Hells Angels funeral in Maple Ridge

Body of Chad John Wilson found last month face-down under the Golden Ears Bridge.

B.C. animation team the ‘heart’ of new ‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’

The animators, largely based in Vancouver, ultimately came up with a creative technique that is drawing praise

Light at the end of the tunnel for UN climate talks

Meeting in Katowice was meant to finalize how countries report their emissions of greenhouses gases

Gas prices to climb 11 cents overnight in Lower Mainland

Hike of 17 cents in less than 48 hours due to unexpected shutdown of Washington state pipeline

Janet Jackson, Def Leppard, Nicks join Rock Hall of Fame

Radiohead, the Cure, Roxy Music and the Zombies will also be ushered in at the 34th induction ceremony

Supreme Court affirms privacy rights for Canadians who share a computer

Section 8 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects Canadians against unreasonable search and seizure

Most Read