Getting the most out of rhododendrons

When we think of rhododendrons, we usually conjure up images of lush foliaged varieties smothered in huge trusses of blossoms. According to the respected Oregon rhododendron authority, Ted Van Veen, over 800 species and over 10,000 named varieties grow within 800 miles of the North Pole and as far south as the sand dunes of Florida.

Rhododendrons are easy to grow

When we think of rhododendrons, we usually conjure up images of lush foliaged varieties smothered in huge trusses of blossoms.  According to the respected Oregon rhododendron authority, Ted Van Veen, over 800 species and over 10,000 named varieties grow within 800 miles of the North Pole and as far south as the sand dunes of Florida.  The well-known rhododendrons growing in Manning Provincial Park are just one example of the uniqueness of some varieties.  Although other species survive in other parts of the province, the West Coast is really the best home for these lovely plants.

Rhododendrons are easy to grow, but far too many folks have problems because they do not understand their needs.  As the renowned Oregon rhododendron expert, Harold Greer, points out, rhododendrons are foraging plants and won’t tolerate some situations.

First, according to Greer, they must have a constant supply of moisture.  Plants set out under huge trees often lose the battle for water and die because few folks realize that large trees can draw as much as 100 gallons of water a day during periods of warm weather.  Rhododendrons need access to moisture, especially during cold or hot weather to prevent desiccation of their lovely foliage.

Secondly, rhododendrons need well drained soil.  Slow draining soil or high water tables are the kiss of death for rhododendrons.  Phytophtora, or root rot, is a serious concern in rhododendrons, and little can be done to save a plant once this disease sets in.  This is not to say rhododendrons must be grown in sandy or gravelly soil, quite the contrary.  They love soils rich in organic matter and peat, but water must drain away quickly.

The third requirement for rhododendrons – and this is a very important one – is aeration.  It is essential that rhododendron roots have access to oxygen. I always like to mix fir or hemlock bark mulch into the planting hole to provide adequate aeration.

Once you understand the soil requirements of rhododendrons, it’s then up to you to find a plant to suit your particular location.  Most rhododendrons have a hardiness rating.  This rating, often given in terms of zones, indicates the minimum temperature a well matured plant can take without serious injury.  In the eastern Fraser Valley, for example, often vicious northeast winds dictate that H1 and H2 varieties are more likely to survive than some of the less hardy ones.  Varieties, like ‘Anna Kruschke’, ‘Trude Webster’, ‘Rocket’ and ‘Cosmopolitan’, will all tolerate temperatures of    -26°C with minimal winter damage.

Folks are still confused about the amount of sun a rhododendron can tolerate.  I always use this rule of thumb:  the larger the leaves, the more shade it will tolerate; conversely, the smaller the leaves, the more sun it will take.  Unless a rhododendron has exceptionally large leaves, it has no business being in the shade, otherwise it becomes leggy and really quite unsightly.  When you hear that some rhododendrons do not like the sun, it means that they should not be planted against a south or west facing wall with intense reflected heat, unless this situation can be alleviated by planting a small shade tree to act as a screen between noon and 3 p.m. to protect the rhododendron from the sun’s hottest rays.  Out in the open, however, rhododendrons do just fine, especially if they are surrounded by complementary plantings.

When planting new rhododendrons, it is essential to very gently loosen the roots of container grown plants to encourage them to take off in the new soil.  Field grown, burlapped rhododendrons must have the sack left on to prevent the rootball from falling apart.

As many varieties of rhododendrons are now coming into bloom,  it’s a golden opportunity to visit your local garden shops to choose some of your favourites.  Remember:  rhododendrons always look best in groupings, either with other complementary plants or by themselves in groups of threes.  From the tiniest miniature ‘Impeditum’ to the huge ‘Anna Rose Whitney’, your landscape will surely benefit from these wonderful plants.

Just Posted

B.C. reservists gather for military communications training in Chilliwack

Canadian Army’s communication skills are used in battle as well as domestic emergencies

VIDEO: ‘Heroes’ rescue teenager trapped in vehicle in water-filled ditch in Chilliwack

Two men sprang into action, holding 17-year-old’s head out of water as they pried open door

Sarah Wark rallies to beat Prince Edward Island at Scotties Tournament of Hearts

Wark wasn’t at the top of her game, but her team did enough to improve to 6-3 overall.

GW Graham junior boys play underdog role at basketball provincials

One of two at-large seeds in the 32 team field, the Grizzlies face a tough opponent out of the gate.

Unfinished business for GW Graham basketball Grizzlies at AA provincials

GWG’s senior girls squad advanced to the final before losing in 2018 and look to win it all in 2019.

Sell regulated heroin to curb B.C.’s overdose problem: report

B.C. Centre on Substance Use points to organized crime and money-laundering as contributing factors

Man charged in stabbing of woman, off-duty cop outside B.C. elementary school

Manoj George, 49, is facing two counts of aggravated assault and two counts of assault with a weapon after the incident on Wednesday, Feb. 20.

Why do zebras have stripes? Perhaps to dazzle away flies

Researchers from University of Bristol look into why zebras have stripes

Poll: More voters believe Canada doing worse under Trudeau government

22 per cent believed the country is doing better and 27 per cent said things are the same

HBC shuttering Home Outfitters across Canada

North America’s oldest retailer is revamping its various stores to improve profitability

BC SPCA investigates Okanagan woman with prior animal abuse convictions

BC SPCA is investigating a property near Vernon

Man wanted for sex trafficking, confinement may be heading to B.C.

Kevin Myrthil, 26, is also accused of assault on a 19-year-old woman at an Edmonton hotel

B.C. Speaker Darryl Plecas resumes battle with suspended staff

Committee meets at B.C. legislature to consider new allegations

Northern B.C. train derailment due to broken axle could happen again: TSB

CN coal train derailment caused by broken axle can happen again without a different way to inspect

Most Read