Photo posted to grousemountain.com.

Photo posted to grousemountain.com.

‘Vancouver’s North Pole’ set to open with skating pond, Light Walk and more

Annual attraction at Grouse Mountain raises funds for BC Children’s Hospital

The place known as “Vancouver’s North Pole” is set to open for the season.

Grouse Mountain’s annual Peak of Christmas attraction gets going Friday (Nov. 22) and runs until Jan. 5.

A highlight is the 8,000-square-foot mountaintop skating pond located next to Santa’s Workshop, where visitors young and old can share their Christmas wishes and take a photo. Donations benefit BC Children’s Hospital.

From dusk to 10 p.m., light installations glow on the mountain’s popular Light Walk.

Day and night, Santa’s Reindeer are there for a visit, and “Reindeer Ranger Talks” are held at noon and 3 p.m.

Nearby, a sliding zone welcomes those who rent a sled, and sleigh rides depart from outside Santa’s Workshop every 20 minutes, daily from 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. (snow level and weather permitting).

Inside the Peak Chalet, a Gingerbread Village involves a “best house” contest in another fundraiser for BC Children’s Hospital. On the chalet’s main floor, the entertainment calendar includes VOC Sweet Gospel Choir, Seymour Dance School, musician Rob Eller, Four Calling Birds Quartet and others. Also, a “Theatre in the Sky” is where Christmas movies are shown from morning until night.

Meantime, the popular Breakfast with Santa meals run from Nov. 30 through Dec. 24, and The Observatory’s three-course Christmas Lunch also returns on weekdays from Dec. 2 to 24.

A schedule of Peak of Christmas events is posted to grousemountain.com, along with ticket details. Activities are free with an annual or snow pass, a Skyride admission ticket or at a family rate of $99 for two adults and two children. For more information, call 604-980-9311.



tom.zillich@surreynowleader.com

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