Tickets for the Harrison Festival of the Arts. (Harrison Festival/Facebook)

Harrison Festival to open with film night for the first time

The Festival is bringing back film to its line up, with this year’s showing of ‘RUMBLE’

This year, the Harrison Festival of the Arts will be kicking off its week of entertainment with something a little different: a film night.

“It just seemed like a natural fit to extend the art forms that we’re already presenting,” festival director Andy Hillhouse said. “Because we’re about not just music, even though music is 90 per cent of what we do. We try to be multi-disciplinary.”

“We’ve got a lot of other performing arts. Even dance in there, a little bit,” he added. But film, he said, is “the one thing we haven’t had for a number of years.”

RELATED: Harrison Festival releases 2019 line up

In the past, Hillhouse said, the festival had tried out a film night back when Agassiz had a theatre in its small town. But that was decades ago now, and the festival society decided the time was ripe for a revival.

This year’s film night, taking place at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, July 12 at Memorial Hall, will feature RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World. The music documentary explores the role of Indigenous artists in rock and roll, and how they shaped the music that would define popular culture for more than half a century. 

“We figured it was a nice film that fits in with the festival and what we’re about,” Hillhouse said. “We want films about music, that’s about culture. But it’s kind of fun and interesting too.”

This year’s festival line up features a number of different Indigenous artists, including musicians iskwē and Riit, drum maker Darren Charlie and weaver Karla Point. The Kent-Harrison Arts Council will also be featuring Indigenous visual artists at the Ranger Station Gallery during the Harrison Festival.

SEE ALSO: National Arts Centre spotlights Indigenous and female artists in upcoming season

Festival marketing manager Bryan Cutler isn’t sure what the reception will be like for the film night — he’s hoping for a successful evening, but says the idea is “unprecedented.”

“Is it going to do really well? Is it going to do really poorly? Who knows. It’s unprecedented basically,” Cutler said. “It was a nice introduction to see how it goes this year, and inform next year’s.”

If the night is a success, Cutler says, the film night will likely come back for next year’s festival and possibly be introduced into the Season of Performing Arts, which goes from September and May of each year.

Tickets for RUMBLE are $10 and can be purchased in person at the Ranger Station Gallery, over the phone at 604-796-3664, or online at harrisonfestival.com.

For more stories on the Harrison Festival of the Arts, visit agassizharrisonobserver.com/tag/harrison-festival-of-the-arts.



grace.kennedy@ahobserver.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Harrison Festival of the Arts

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Chilliwack to remember D-Day veterans on 76th anniversary of Normandy landing

Thousands died June 6, 1944, coming ashore on beaches in France while facing heavy German resistance

Road washout affecting section of Highway No. 3 near Manning Park

Road maintenance crews are on the scene, with an almost two kilometre long stretch impacted

Column: Patience and persistence required with green technology

Solar panels and wind farms aren’t yet where we need them to be, but does that mean we give up?

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

New platform allows readers to make a one-time or ongoing donation to support local journalism

Caretakers say goodbye to Gwynne Vaughan heritage house in Chilliwack after 17 years

Larry and Vicky Graitson have seen a lot of changes at the community park over the years

VIDEO: Injured bald eagle rescued in B.C. First Nations community

Bird suspected injured in fight, whisked off to Coquitlam rehab

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

New platform allows readers to make a one-time or ongoing donation to support local journalism

Human Rights Tribunal denies church’s request to toss out White Rock Pride Society’s complaint

Star of the Sea and White Rock Pride Society to go to Human Rights Tribunal hearing

Toronto Raptors’ Ujiri says conversations about racism can no longer be avoided

Thousands have protested Floyd’s death and repeated police killings of black men across the United States

‘I’m afraid’: Witnesses of wolf attack on senior near Prince Rupert worried about safety

Frank Russ shows where the unprovoked wolf attacked his father

Abbotsford’s UFV gym now without a sponsor

Partnership with Envision Financial ends, school seeking new organizations to partner with

Protesters prepare to rally against racism in front of Vancouver Art Gallery

Rally is in response to the deaths of black Americans and a Toronto woman

Protesters rally against anti-black, Indigenous racism in Toronto

Police estimated the crowd to be between 3,500 and 4,000 and said there was no violence

Most Read