Chilliwack Mall will be a busy place next week as the Rotary Book Sale returns Sunday.

Book sale spawns generations of readers

For 17 years, Cecile Murray has opened the eyes of children to the world of books around them.

For 17 years, Cecile Murray has opened the eyes of children to the world of books around them.

She’s helped them find classic Robert Munsch and beloved Goosebumps, and has helped them rediscover old tales, including Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys, and the If You Give A… series by Laura Numeroff.

Murray, 67, is one of the Rotary Book Sale’s veteran volunteers where she has been sorting children’s books and connecting children with books for years.

But she’s not a Rotary Club member.

She does it for the love of reading, she says.

Murray first got involved with the book sale through Rotary Anns, a now defunct club, that was comprised of Rotary members’ wives, before it was common for women to be Rotary members themselves.

“We were asked to look after the magazines for the book sale, and eventually that led into children’s books,” says Murray.

After Rotary Anns folded in 1999, “a couple of us just kept on going with it.”

For Murray, there was no question she would continue.

The avid reader, who almost always has a book on the go, ingrained a love of reading in her own three children, who then passed that love on to their children.

She has also regularly volunteered in the public library and school libraries.

“I’m quite an advocate for children’s reading,” she says. “My children are all avid readers through my efforts and now their children are through their efforts.”

And when she sees her teenage grandchildren choose books over computer games, it warms her heart.

These days, however, that’s often not the choice made.

“There are so many things out there taking children away from reading: computers, TV, movies, video games,” says Murray. “I strongly believe it is so important for children to read and for parents to still read to their children.”

And she believes her efforts with the Rotary Book Sale is helping to achieve just that.

This year’s children’s section will feature a wide selection of picture books, young reader books, junior and teen novels, activity books, comics, and more.

“One of the things I love most about doing this is, at the sale… being able to find a child something they haven’t read before and to see them happily wander off with a couple of treasures in their hands,” she says.

In addition to kids’ books, the sale will have thousands of other used books up for grabs, including best sellers, romance, Harlequins, mystery, war, western, and even a few collector editions. Records, CDs, DVDs and selected magazines will also be available. Prices will range from $1 to $5 for both fiction and non-fiction. Collector books are individually priced based on research.

The Rotary Book Sale runs from Oct. 16 to 22 at Chilliwack Mall.

kbartel@theprogress.com

Just Posted

Judge to decide on mental fitness of man accused of Chilliwack River Valley shooting

Two psychiatrists disagree on fitness of Peter Kampos but Crown and defence agree he is unfit

Around the BCHL: Surrey Eagles sliding and Cassidy Bowes flows

Around the BCHL is a look at what’s happening in the league and around the junior A world.

BC Ferries passengers wait to leave Vancouver Island after Remembrance Day

Traffic aboard BC Ferries slows after Remembrance Day long weekend

Chilliwack Mayor Ken Popove on the first 100 days

One-on-one discussion with the new mayor paints a picture of what’s in store for Chilliwack

UPDATE: Man, 19, dies in shooting on Ross Road in Abbotsford

Victim was airlifted to hospital Monday afternoon, but died shortly afterwards

VIDEO: Amazon to split second HQ between New York, Virginia

Official decision expected later Tuesday to end competition between North American cities to win bid and its promise of 50,000 jobs

Kuhnhackl scores 2 odd goals as Isles dump Canucks 5-2

Vancouver drops second game in two nights

Fear of constitutional crisis escalates in U.S.; Canadians can relate

Some say President Donald Trump is leading the U.S. towards a crisis

B.C.-based pot producer Tilray reports revenue surge, net loss

Company remains excited about ‘robust’ cannabis industry

Canada stands pat on Saudi arms sales, even after hearing Khashoggi tape

Khashoggi’s death at Saudi Arabia’s consulate in Istanbul further strained Riyadh’s already difficult relationship with Ottawa

Feds pledge money for young scientists, but funding for in-house research slips

Canada’s spending on science is up almost 10 per cent since the Liberals took office, but spending on in-house research is actually down

Stink at B.C. school prompts complaints of headaches, nausea

Smell at Abbotsford school comes from unauthorized composting operation

Disabled boy has ‘forgiven’ bullies who walked on him in stream, mom says

A Cape Breton teen who has cerebral palsy was told to lie in a stream as other kids walked over him

Letters shed light on state of mind of B.C. mom accused of daughter’s murder

Trial of South Surrey mother Lisa Batstone begins in BC Supreme Court

Most Read