Blazers drawing fire

Chilliwack Bruins radio colour man Jacob Bestebroer writes a weekly column for the Chilliwack Progress during the Western Hockey League season.

Are the Kamloops Blazers breaking an unwritten hockey rule with their post-game celebration?

Do they respect the game? It’s been a controversial week in the WHL, giving Bruins radio colour man Jacob Besetbroer plenty to discuss.

By far the number one question thrown my way this week has been, ‘What did you think of the Kamloops Blazers victory celebration Saturday night?’

First let’s explain what that question is referencing.

After each win, the Blazers mimic the winning celebration from a 1994 NHL video game. The celebration consists of bending your knees slightly and pumping your stick up and down over your head like a weightlifter lifting a barbell.

I played this video game back in the day. The celebration was funny then and it’s funny now.

But it has no place in the actual game.

I get that things like this can bring a team closer together and that is something every team is always trying to improve, but the time and place for this is during practice and not after a league game.

Actions like this and planned celebrations after scoring show a lack of respect for your opponent and more importantly the game. When this video game came out, the Blazers were a great team in the midst of winning three Memorial Cups in four years.

Would those teams, teams that actually had something substantial to celebrate ever have considered doing something like this? Not a chance, because they respected the game.

There has also been a lot of discussion about how the referee in that game, Andy Thiessen, pushed Bruins forward Blair Wentworth up against the glass in an effort to settle down a late game altercation. I can only say that it looked bad.

The Bruins and Blazers have had some heated battles on the ice this year and I expect more this weekend.

The Bruins trail the Blazers, who hold down the final playoff spot in the Western Conference, by one point (with four games in hand).

The Canadian Cancer Society and the Bruins join forces Feb. 12 when the Bruins host the Kelowna Rockets to Fight Back Against Cancer.

Chilliwack Mayor Sharon Gaetz and other local notables will take a swing at cancer, or in this case a car with the word cancer painted on it. It’s symbolic, and many of those who have been touched by cancer would welcome the opportunity to ‘take a swing at cancer.’

Beginning at 4 p.m., the public will have the opportunity to take a swing for a minimum $5 donation.

Special $15 tickets are available at the Canadian Cancer Society Office (9136 Young Rd), with four dollars from each ticket going to the Canadian Cancer Society.

At the game, the 50/50, stick auction, haircuts, Johnston’s Meat raffle – will all be held in support of the Canadian Cancer Society.

Go online to www.chilliwackbruins.com and follow the Fight Back link to donate. Feb. 12th is also Hockey Day in Canada and it’s game day in Chilliwack, so here is your opportunity to support your Bruins and to help Fight Back against this terrible disease.

jb@chilliwackbruins.com

Just Posted

Nominations open for UFV Betty Urquhart Community Service award

Award recognizes those who make community a better place to live

Parent concerned over privacy breach is a candidate for Chilliwack school board

Brian Mielke said sharing of student names with U.S. research firm shows trustees disregarding law

Chilliwack athletes run in the rain at first cross-country race

Dozens of elementary/middle/high schoolers tackled a mucky course next to Twin Rinks last Thursday.

Fraser River First Nations say they aren’t getting their share of sockeye

Shortage is a result of decisions made by DFO, not a shortage of sockeye, complaint says

Chilliwack Chiefs benefit from BCHL Showcase exposure

Carter Wilkie’s first BCHL goal Saturday against Wenatchee earned him talks with several NCAA scouts.

Video: Flyers new mascot ‘Gritty’ a bearded, googly-eyed terror

The Philadelphia Flyers unveiled their new mascot Monday, and as one would expect of the team that gave us the “Broad Street Bullies,” he’s far from cuddly.

Vancouver, Delta police won’t use new roadside saliva test to detect pot

The Dräger DrugTest 5000 is designed to find THC, the high-inducing part of marijuana

Canada aiming for the moon, and beyond, with new space technology efforts

With an eye on future lunar exploration, Canada’s space agency is calling on companies to present their ideas for everything from moon-rover power systems to innovative mineral prospecting techniques.

New Brunswick Premier meets with lieutenant-governor as Tories, Liberals vie for power

New Brunswick Premier Brian Gallant said the only other leader he had spoken with since results came in was Green Leader David Coon.

Trudeau looks to restart Canada’s UN charm offensive in New York City

Freeland says the question of job retraining in the 21st century — and the uncertainty that surrounds it — is the federal government’s central preoccupation.

Calgary mayor seeks person who leaked details of closed-door Olympic meeting

Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi says he will ask the city’s integrity commissioner to investigate a leak of details from an in-camera council meeting.

South Surrey boy, 10, to help kids in need

Ronin Bulmer, 10, is going door-to-door asking for donations

B.C. MP Cannings spared brunt of Ottawa tornadoes

MP Richard Cannings was spared the impact of the tornadoes that hit the Ottawa region

Edmonton cannabis company revenues more than triples to $19.1 million

Aurora Cannabis revenues more than triple in fourth quarter

Most Read