Theodore SCHWAERZLE

(Ted)

Dec 12, 1924 – Jan 29, 2010

Ted passed away peacefully January 29th, 2010, at the Chilliwack General Hospital at the age of 85. Leaving behind to celebrate his life and legacy are his loving wife Ellen of 60 years, his three children Ken Schwaerzle (Debbie) of Agassiz, Eric Schwaerzle (Shelley) of Abbotsford and Audrey Martin of Abbotsford, also 10 grandchildren: Sheri (Kerri), Chilliwack; Dwayne (Kim), Armstrong; Mark (Tammy), Laird, Saskatchewan; Chelsey, Agassiz; Tanya, Agassiz; Stacey (Chris), Abbotsford; Brandy (TC), Sundrie, Alberta; Travis, Abbotsford; Michelle (Jonn), Abbotsford; and Murray, Surrey; and 13 great-grandchildren.

Ted came to Canada in 1929 from Germany along with his Mother to meet his Father who had come to Canada earlier. They settled on a farm in Sumas Prairie where they raised tobacco, sugar beets and milked cows. He lost his father when he was nine years old due to a tragic accident on Sumas Mountain. Even with this extra burden Ted managed to complete his grade 12 education, graduating from Phillip Shefield, which was the only high school in those days. Later on raspberries were planted on the farm and our Mother came out from Edmonton to earn money and met the man of her dreams.

During the flood of 1948 Ted was active with the Dyking Commission and regularly assisted with sand-bagging and patrolling the dykes.

In the early 1950s Ted was instrumental in having the Yarrow Waterworks expanded to include our area to improve the drinking water. Our Dad was also involved in many community organizations he was a Director of Dairyland, a 4H leader in the Chilliwack District for many years and sat on the Variance Board with the District of Abbotsford.

Dad was one of the founding members of the South Coastal Dairy Educational Committee which today is known as the Pacific Agricultural Show. He was influential in the completion of the book of the history of Sumas Prairie area which was titled “One Foot on the Border”. Our Father was acknowledged as a Director of the Sumas Prairie and Area Historical Society and his name is inscribed on the monument across from Upper Sumas School which he attended as a young boy.

Dad enjoyed sharing his stories of the early days of Sumas Prairie and his hunting, fishing and farming tales were always entertaining, educational and amusing.

The family would like to express their thanks for the wonderful care and compassion of the nurses of the ICU and the third floor nurses of the Chilliwack General Hospital.

No service will be held at Ted’s request.

Be a life long or short, its completeness depends on what it was lived for.